Hardanger Fiddle

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Hardanger Fiddle

 

(also hardangerfele, hardingfela), a Norwegian folk violin. The Hardanger fiddle is smaller than the ordinary violin, with a more highly arched belly, a shorter neck, and a broader bridge. It has four melody strings that are tuned to the key of the music to be performed. The four sympathetic strings are tuned to the first, second, third, and fifth degrees of the key. Usually inlaid with silver and mother-of-pearl, the Hardanger fiddle is used to perform folk dance melodies known as slåtter.

REFERENCE

Lange, K., and A. Sstvedt. Norvezhskaia muzyka. Moscow, 1967. Pages 12–14. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The drone strings help give it a rich and resonant tone, and for the on-site recording sessions in Norway, Tibbetts used one microphone close to the instruments and another about 20 feet away in the Utne church where he recorded Knut Hamre and fellow Hardingfele player Turid Spildo.
The sound of the Hardingfele is always at the center, but it is joined and augmented by the sounds of the other instruments and sometimes by the voice of Turid Spildo.
This is by all means not an archival recording of indigenous unadulterated Norwegian folk fiddling, it is a rich musical tapestry informed by traditional Hardingfele music and then transformed by the musical and acoustical vision of Steve Tibbetts and the musical and acoustical contributions of his band of merry Minnesota musical mavens into something that music lovers should adore and audiophiles should swoon over.