hard rock

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hard rock

[′härd ¦räk]
(geology)
Rock which needs drilling and blasting for removal.

hard rock

Rock, which is found during excavation, that can be removed only by pneumatic tools or explosives.
References in periodicals archive ?
This archaic, 125-year-old law permits mining companies to gouge billions of dollars' worth of gold, silver, platinum, palladium and other hardrock minerals from public lands, without paying one red cent to the real owners, the American people.
If the claim-holder can prove to the Department of Interior that his claim contains commercially producible hardrock minerals, then the government must grant the applicant a deed or "patent" to the lands for the princely sum of between $2.
Such a program could be administered by the Environmental Protection Agency in conjunction with the Department of Interior and financed by a fee on hardrock ores being mined.
The 1872 Mining Law only covers one-third of hardrock mining in the U.
Downie said they ran into ground issues that prevented them from exploring their number one target, which forced them to bump the project from "flagship" to number three in priority behind Hardrock and its McCoy-Cove property in Nevada.
Based upon USGS data on 15 common hardrock minerals, over the past 32 years, the degree to which the United States has relied on imported minerals to satisfy its domestic consumption has held relatively constant for 4 of those minerals (fluorspar, gypsum, palladium, and platinum); fluctuated for 5 (copper, lead, silver, tungsten, and zinc); increased for 4 (barite, magnesium compounds, magnesium metal, and perlite); and decreased for 2 (gold and nickel.
The Hardrock is a light, versatile bike that can handle anything and is perfect for true off-road riding.
By far the most persistent and damaging environmental effect from abandoned mines--both hardrock and coal--is AMD.
hardrock mineral production and 75 percent of all U.
Premier Gold Mines reports a "milestone" achievement at its Hardrock deposit in nortwestern Ontario.
The Mining Act of 1872 helped foster the development of the West by giving individuals exclusive rights to mine gold, silver, copper, and other hardrock minerals on federal lands.
According to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences report Hardrock Mining on Federal Lands, more than 157,000 acres are already being mined or are affected by active mining exploration.