Harfleur


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Related to Harfleur: Agincourt

Harfleur

(ärflör`), town (1993 est. pop. 9,221), Seine-Maritime dept., N France, at the mouth of the Seine River on the English Channel. It was a flourishing port during the later Middle Ages but declined because of silting in the 16th cent. The siege and capture (1415) of Harfleur by the English in the Hundred Years War is described by Shakespeare in Henry V.

Harfleur

a port in N France, in Seine-Maritime department: important centre in the Middle Ages. Pop.: 8517 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
From there, hop over the soaring bridge Pont de Normandie to Harfleur, where Henry V landed his army and urged them: "Once more into the breach, dear friends.
While an attribution of psychopathic tendencies to Shakespeare's Henry V himself would admittedly not be beyond the realms of critical credibility, the distinction remains that the king's ugly threat to the governor and the citizens of Harfleur effectively forecloses the imagined violence; it does not revel in its fulfilment like the rhetoric of Tamburlaine, or memorialize its horror in strangely unempathetic ways, as in Dido, Queen of Carthage.
It was as if with an uncanny prescience that Shakespeare had written for them the speech of Henry V at the Battle of Harfleur when he declared to his men that he and they were a "band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother".
When the dust settles, notwithstanding a welter of political miscues, history might well remember the episode as Obama's Harfleur, where an announced threat of potentially illegal force catalyzed a better nonviolent result, thereby reinvigorating multilateral diplomacy abroad and much-needed public debate at home.
Ya en tierras francesas, sitia Harfleur y tras una dura batalla Enrique invita--con un discurso bastante convincente--al gobernador en turno, a ceder y rendirse ante el ejercito ingles antes de que la masacre sea mayor.
Henry's army takes on Harfleur, and culminates in battling the French at Agincourt.
In describing the exploits of the untried Henry V, William Shakespeare--no stranger to historical drama--places the newly-crowned monarch in the thick of conflict, first at the French port of Harfleur, and then, a few scenes later, a stone's throw away from the impending Agincourt assault.
N'Zogbia has enjoyed operating as a tricky winger ever since he was a schoolboy growing up in the seaside port of Harfleur in Normandy in northern France.
The Chorus refers to the "nimble gunner" who "With linstock now the devilish cannon touches" before Harfleur (3.
Though always attentive to the political advantage of a situation, then, Henry also displays, in this as in later incidents (such as his relief when the mayor surrenders Harfleur without a fight), a moral sense derived from his own conscience and sense of empathy, allowing him to unite his political persona (the public self legally authorized to act) with his charismatic persona (the private self aware of the human and ethical consequences of his actions).