Harold Adams Innis

Innis, Harold Adams

 

Born Nov. 5, 1894; died Nov. 8, 1952. Canadian bourgeois economist and historian. Doctor of philosophy (1920).

In 1916, Innis graduated from McMaster University (in Hamilton, Ontario). In 1920 he became a professor of political economy at the University of Toronto, and from 1937 on he was dean of the department of economics. Innis was president of the Canadian Political Science Association (from 1937) and president of an association of economic historians (from 1942). He was the founder of the study of Canada’s economic history. He did research on the principal branches of the country’s economy and on the interrelationship between politics and economics, attributing great importance to the influence of the geographic environment and of transportation on the life of society.

WORKS

Political Economy in the Modern State. Toronto, 1946.
Empire and Communications. Oxford, 1950.
Changing Concepts of Time. Toronto, 1952.

REFERENCE

The Culture of Contemporary Canada. Edited by J. Park. New York, 1957.
References in periodicals archive ?
Few early-20lh-century figures continue to stand as tall in Canadian historiography as Harold Adams Innis.
2) Harold Adams Innis, The Fur Trade in Canada: An Introduction to Canadian Economic History (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1930); Harold Adams Innis and Daniel Drache, Staples, Markets, and Cultural Change: Selected Essays (Montreal; Buffalo: McGill-Queen'sUniversity Press, 1995).
Discovering 'The Significance of Communication': Harold Adams Innis as Social Constructivist", in Canadian Journal of Communication [en ligne], no 2, vol.
Also of interest to media ecology scholars is the posthumous publication of his notes as The Idea File of Harold Adams Innis (1980).
Volume I of the Historical Atlas of Canada (1987) is dedicated to the memory of Harold Adams Innis and of Andrew Hill Clark (historical geographer, and a UTP author).
After locating the roots with Adam Smith and Karl Marx, the Canadian classic staples tradition pioneered by Harold Adams Innis and W.