Markowitz, Harry

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Markowitz, Harry

(mär`kəwĭts'), 1927–, American economist, Ph.D. Univ. of Chicago, 1954. In the 1950s he developed a theory of "portfolio choice," which allows investors to analyze risk as well as their expected return. For this work Markowitz, a professor at Baruch College at the City Univ. of New York, shared the 1990 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with William Sharpe and Merton MillerMiller, Merton H.,
1923–2000, American economist, grad. Harvard, 1943, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, 1952. A professor at Carnegie-Mellon Univ. (1953–61) and the Univ.
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It is investment in a diversified by Nobel prize-winning economist Harry Markowitz, renowned in investment circles for his sometimes criticized but respected Modern Portfolio theory of diversification.
Harry Markowitz, the father of MPT, admitted long ago he'd prefer to have used the semi-variance, but for the fact his computers didn't have the capacity to handle the processing load.
Harry Markowitz won a 1990 Nobel Prize in economics for efficiently passing the buck--make that bucks.
A half a century ago, economist Harry Markowitz came up with something called modern portfolio theory, which said it was possible to model and compare investments and find the optimum mix of assets at a prescribed level of risk.
Picerno (editor, The Beta Investment Report) asks whether we have learned anything since the introduction of modern portfolio theory (MPT) in a 1952 journal article by Harry Markowitz.
Thus, Robert Merton, William Sharpe, and Harry Markowitz, all major figures in the first volume, reappear in the sequel.
Early in the 1950s Harry Markowitz suggested that asset allocation accounts for approximately 90% of portfolio performance on a risk-adjusted basis, a figure that has been borne out repeatedly by subsequent studies, and, incidentally, earned him a Nobel Prize for Economics in 1990.
Rosenfeld described the way they've laid the matrix out, and the way they determine the suppliers with which they'll work, as a financial portfolio, and said that they're deploying a model devised by a Nobel Prize-winning economist, Harry Markowitz (www.
Both were used by Harry Markowitz in his 1959 book Portfolio Selection, which won him a Nobel Prize and caused these measures to be enshrined in MBA textbooks.
Harry Markowitz (1) suggested that the latter could be diversified away, meaning that by buying more than one share you must reduce the risk of outright failure.
Harry Markowitz and Merton Miller developed MPT in 1952 and William Sharpe expanded on it later; the three won the 1990 Nobel Prize for Economics for their contribution to investment methodology.
candidate named Harry Markowitz began researching the role of risk in the process of investing.

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