Hartlepool

(redirected from Hartlepools)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Hartlepool

(härt`lēpo͞ol, härt`əl–), borough and unitary authority (2011 pop. 92,028), NE England. A seaport, Hartlepool imports timber, wood pulp, petroleum, and iron ore. Industries include shipbuilding, iron and steel manufacturing, marine engineering, and brewing. Servicing the North Sea petroleum fields has become increasingly important. Hartlepool is also the home of a herring fleet. A convent founded on the site in 640 was famous under St. Hilda (649–657) and was destroyed by the Danes in 800. In the 12th and 13th cent., Hartlepool was the chief port of the palatinate of DurhamDurham,
officially County Durham,
county (1991 pop. 589,941), 1,015 sq mi (2,629 sq km), NE England, on the North Sea between the Tees and Tyne rivers; administratively, Durham is a unitary authority (since 2009).
..... Click the link for more information.
. The West Hartlepool dock developed in the 19th cent. as a port for coal export. A nuclear power plant was completed in the early 1980s.

Hartlepool

1. a port in NE England, in Hartlepool unitary authority, Co. Durham, on the North Sea: greatly enlarged in 1967 by its amalgamation with West Hartlepool; engineering, clothing, food processing. Pop.: 86 075 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in NE England, in Co. Durham: formerly (1974--96) part of the county of Cleveland. Pop.: 90 200 (2003 est.). Area: 93 sq. km (36 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Born in Albert Street, Hartlepool, in 1858, James Clark was first employed at the age of 12 as an office boy and assistant in an architect's office, and it was this experience which apparently made the youngster determined to become a painter.
In 1880 he spent several months in Paris before returning to Hartlepool where a number of commissions gave him enough money to marry his childhood sweetheart Elizabeth Hunter at Stranton Church in 1882.
These include the Bombardment painting and also St Hilda At Hartlepool, which was painted in 1925.