Hasidim

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Hasidim

or

Chassidim

(both: häsē`dĭm, khä–) [Heb.,=the pious], term used by the rabbis to describe those Jews who maintained the highest standard of religious observance and moral action. The term has been applied to movements at three distinct times. The first Hasidim, also called the Assideans or Hasideans, were an ancient Jewish sect that developed between 300 B.C. and 175 B.C. They were the most rigid adherents of Judaism in contradistinction to those Jews who were beginning to be affected by Hellenistic influences. The Hasidim led the resistance to the hellenizing campaign of Antiochus IV of Syria, and they figured largely in the early phases of the revolt of the MaccabeesMaccabees
or Machabees
, Jewish family of the 2d and 1st cent. B.C. that brought about a restoration of Jewish political and religious life. They are also called Hasmoneans or Asmoneans after their ancestor, Hashmon.
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. Their ritual strictness has caused some to see them as forerunners of the Pharisees. Throughout the Talmudic period numerous figures were referred to as Hasidim. During the 12th and 13th cent., however, there arose in Germany a specific group known as the Hasidei Ashkenaz. Influenced by Saadia ben Joseph and with messianic and mystical elements, it held as its central ideology the unity of God, the application of justice in all situations, social and economic equality, and martyrdom at the hands of the crusaders rather than compromise of any kind. The chief ethical work that derived from the group was the Sefer Hasidim (tr. Book of the Pious, 1973). The third movement to which the term Hasidim is applied is that founded in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov and known as HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
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.

Bibliography

See S. Lieberman, Hellenism in Jewish Palestine (1962); S. G. Kramer, God and Man in the Sefer Hasidim (1966); A. L. Lowenkopf, The Hasidim (1973). See also bibliography under HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
..... Click the link for more information.
.

References in periodicals archive ?
In another context, the Talmud suggests, "The person who wants to become a hasid should abide by the laws concerning torts and damages, so said Rav Judah.
25) He was particularly upset in the way the Maggid separated himself from the ordinary hasid.
Hasid will oversee and manage the organization's portfolio of assets, develop growth strategies and monitor risk assessment.
Consider Dov Binyamin, the Jerusalem hasid of the title story, whose wife denies him sex, and whose rebbe grants him a "special dispensation" to visit a prostitute "for the relief of unbearable urges" (181-2).
HAP Investments LLC announced that company co-founder Amir Hasid will assume the position of chief investment officer.
SEE: Brooklyn Hasid Charged with Felony Hate Crime After Attacking 'F ing Arabs' Living Next Door (NY Daily News)
At one point, the Sufi Ibrahim Gamard and the hasid Henoch Dov Hoffman--advanced contemplatives in their traditions confess that they could not even debate the situation in Israel and Palestine without endangering their "personal bond" (p.
It has its roots in the teachings of Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, a former Lubavitch Hasid and emissary of the Lubavitcher rebbe.
HAP Investments partners Amir Hasid and Nir Amsel actively raised equity capital from a group of Israeli investors with additional financing arranged by Trevian Capital, a New York based direct capital lender.
Goldman mentioned the fact that zaddik ("righteous"), derived from zeddek, is usually encountered in juxtaposition with hasid (pious), a title derived from hesed, meaning "grace," "benevolence," and "piety," and denoting a devout personality.
Heschel's interpretation of Peretz's drama echoed the lesson of the Kotzker Hasid, Yitzhak Levin, who also "violated" a prohibition for the purpose of preserving joy, the essence of Sabbath.