Hauteclaire

Hauteclaire

Oliver’s trusty sabre. [Fr. Lit.: The Song of Roland]
See: Sword
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Entre elas, encontram-se Martyre, prenome da Madame de Mendoze (Une vieille maftresse, 1851), que sera martirizada por Rino; Jeanne de Feuardent (L'ensorcellee, 1854), queimada em seu braseiro; o tortuoso doutor Torty; a bela e impetuosa Hauteclaire Stassin, que se rebaixou na obscuridade; Rochefort, que e duplamente forte (nas novelas de Les Diaboliques, 1874), etc.
One of Barbey d'Aurevilly's six tales, "Le Bonheur dans le crime," tells that story of a count, Serlon de Savigny, and his mistress, Hauteclaire Stassin, who kill the count's wife and live happily ever after, unmolested by law or conscience.
In Barbey d'Aurevilly's story, Hauteclaire and Serlon are also represented as inverted with respect to gender.
Even without the narrators' explicit judgments, Hauteclaire might have struck nineteenth-century readers as masculine, owing to her fearlessness and prowess in fencing.
Like Nicole and Cristina, Hauteclaire and the comtesse de Savigny differ from each other in their physical constitutions.
But unlike Lucienne, Hauteclaire and Nicole each practice a traditionally feminine craft: sewing for Hauteclaire, crochet for Nicole.
In this world of crime and lies, Hauteclaire feels surprisingly at ease: "elle s'y mouvait et elle y vivait comme le plus flexible des poissons vit et se meut dans l'eau," comments the intrigued Torty, narrator of the story and--as the family doctor--a privileged observer of the action (2: 108).
Se laissait-il plutot aimer par Hauteclaire, plus aimer par elle qu'il ne l'aimait?
Hauteclaire in "Le bonheur dans le crime" is for example "toujours plus ou moins cache" either by the dark mesh of her fencing helmet or by "la dentelle de son voile noir" (2: 94).
Sanchez Moreno, Juan Manuel, "Valle-Inclan y Barbey d'Aurevilly, imagenes femeninas en sus obras Les diaboliques y Femeninas, Hauteclaire y Nina Chole, mujeres esfinge", en F.
Characters like Hauteclaire and Savigny are elusive, but share an undying passion of mythic proportion (the narrator refers to them as "Philemon et Baucis," 2:87) which endows them with a sense of permanence.
He explains to the narrator why Hauteclaire and Savigny never had children, "Le feu,--qui devore,--consume et ne produit pas" (127).