Black-Winged Stilt

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Black-Winged Stilt

 

(Himantopus himantopus), a bird of the family Charadriidae of the suborder Limicolae. The body length is about 37 cm. The plumage is white and black. The legs are very long and pink, and the bill is black. The black-winged stilt is distributed in southern Europe, southern Asia, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and America (except in the north). In the USSR it is found in the south, from the Danube to Lake Zaisan, living along the shores of freshwater and salt lakes and the sea. It nests in colonies. A clutch contains four eggs, which are incubated 25 to 26 days. The black-winged stilt feeds on aquatic insects and other invertebrates and on frog and fish eggs; in winter it also feeds on the seeds of aquatic plants.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since the wetlands enhancement construction work can only be done between August and March to avoid disturbing the Hawaiian stilt and coot during breeding season, it may take two years for the county to complete the construction.
The Hawaiian stilt, a black-and-white wading bird, makes its nest on tufts of land in the middle of coastal wetlands.
Wendy Johnson, President of the Hawaii Audubon Society said, "By devoting extensive resources to the creation of waterbird habitat at its facility, Cyanotech has increased vital nesting and breeding opportunities for the endangered Hawaiian Stilt, or Ae'o.