Hawkins


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Hawkins

1. Coleman. 1904--69, US pioneer of the tenor saxophone for jazz
2. Sir John. 1532--95, English naval commander and slave trader, treasurer of the navy (1577--89); commander of a squadron in the fleet that defeated the Spanish Armada (1588)
References in periodicals archive ?
Hawkins finishes breakfast with his wife and bids farewell to his two youngest children as they head off to school.
During a field trip to the sand dunes of the Oregon coast, a team of dogs harnessed to a cart waited to pull Hawkins along the shore.
Recently named executive editor at the Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina, Hawkins, 61, was once an Army intelligence officer in Vietnam, where he was involved with base security and gathering information about the whereabouts of enemy troops.
Technologist Jeff Hawkins and philosopher John Searle both approach matters of mind and brain from a naturalistic perspective, but their arguments veer sharply from the grim picture sketched above.
The overall strategy being pursued by Beijing in the Western Hemisphere follows "a classic mercantilist or even neo-colonial model," Hawkins contends.
He begins by rooting Hawkins in his Devon milieu and showing how his birth into a family of prosperous pirates and traders--led by his roguish grandfather, the elder William Hawkins--prepared him for the daring, dangerous privateering-cum-huckstering that accompanied his three great voyages to the Caribbean in the 1560s.
Hawkins asserts that these researchers are largely trying to program computers to act like people without first understanding "what intelligence is and what it means to understand.
Hawkins as he and a couple of noncommissioned officers enjoyed lunch at a diner at the Port of Tacoma.
At South Heights School, Hawkins says the media center brings families and communities together.
Hawkins, meanwhile, had severed connections with the Martha Graham Dance Company by 1951 and begun to develop his own approach to movement.
Although nearly anything you said about slavery could be denied in the same breath," muses Andrew Hawkins in a state of freedom, "this much struck me as true: the wretchedness of being colonized was not that slavery created feelings of guilt and indebtedness, though I did feel guilt and debt; nor that it created a long, lurid dream of multiplicity and separateness, which it did indeed create, but the fact that men had epidermalized Being" (52).