Howard Hawks

(redirected from Hawks, Howard)
Howard Hawks
Howard Winchester Hawks
Birthday
BirthplaceGoshen, Indiana, U.S.
Died
Occupation
Film director/producer, screenwriter

Hawks, Howard

(Howard Winchester Hawks), 1896–1977, American film director, b. Goshen, Ind. Although not as well known as such contemporaries as John FordFord, John,
1895–1973, American film director, b. Cape Elizabeth, Maine, as John Martin Feeney. Ford began directing in 1917 after an apprenticeship with his brother Francis.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Alfred HitchcockHitchcock, Sir Alfred,
1899–1980, English-American film director, writer, and producer, b. London. Hitchcock began his career as a director in 1925 and became prominent with The 39 Steps (1935) and The Lady Vanishes (1938).
..... Click the link for more information.
, he has been critically acclaimed as one of the 20th cent.'s best motion picture directors. His directorial career began in the silent film era with The Road to Glory (1926). Hawks's uncomplicated and unpretentious style, visual clarity, and sense for crisp dialogue are evident in his more than 40 films, which cover an unusually wide variety of cinematic genres. Many of his works have become classics, including the war film The Dawn Patrol (1930), the gangster movie Scarface (1932), the screwball comedy Bringing Up Baby (1938), the romantic adventure To Have and Have Not (1944), the detective story The Big Sleep (1946), the Western Red River (1948), and the musical Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). The lucid, direct style that made Hawks the ultimate Hollywood professional has been an important influence on many of today's filmmakers.

Hawks, Howard

(1896–1977) film director, screenwriter, producer; born in Goshen, Ind. A plane and car racer in his teens, he worked as a prop boy in Hollywood during college vacations. He served with the Army Air Corps in World War I; returning to California to work in an aircraft factory, he soon decided to try the new film industry where he held a variety of jobs in the production field before moving on to writing and producing movies. His directorial debut was with his own script, The Road to Glory (1926), which launched a career that spanned 45 years and a broad spectrum of genres, from gangster films (Scarface, 1932) and Westerns (Red River, 1948) to screwball comedies (Bringing Up Baby, 1938) and musicals (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953). Not much of an innovator but in total control of his movies, he was a no-nonsense teller of strong stories, and he came to be highly regarded by French students of film and was awarded an honorary Oscar (1974).
References in periodicals archive ?
Bacall was an 18-year-old model in New York when her face on the cover of Harper's Bazaar caught the eye of Slim Hawks, Howard Hawks' wife.