Bialik, Hayyim Nahman

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Bialik, Hayyim Nahman

(hī`yəm nä`mən byä`lēk), 1873–1934, Hebrew poet, publisher in Odessa, Berlin, and Tel-Aviv, b. Volhynia, Russia. As an editor and publisher Bialik spread the ideas of the enlightenment (Haskalah). His fame began with the publication (1903) of his poem "In the City of Slaughter," inspired by a pogrom in Kishinev. Bialik's style is sometimes biblical, prophetic, and majestic, sometimes simple and lyrical; he had a great effect upon modern Hebrew literature. He wrote novels, humorous songs, and sketches; some of his work is in Yiddish, but his most important writings are in Hebrew. They have been widely translated (English translations of his poems were published in 1924, 1926, and 1948). Bialik translated into Hebrew Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Cervantes's Don Quixote, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Heine's poems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other authors discussed are: Yehuda Amicha, Hayyim Nahman Bialik, Shulamith Hareven, Haim Gouri, Hanoch Bartov, Aharon Megged, and Amos Oz.
Born in the Ukraine in 1873, Hayyim Nahman Bialik received a strict religious Jewish education.
Like all good modernists, Hebrew writers were troubled by language's tendency both to "reveal and conceal," in the phrasing of Hayyim Nahman Bialik, whom Cohen calls the "architect of modern Hebrew poetry.
Sara Feinstein presents the reader with a lavish, meticulously-researched, carefully-written, and obviously lovingly-worked volume on Hayyim Nahman Bialik, the "National Hebrew Poet.
Hayyim Nahman Bialik and his literary accomplishments were among the most powerful influences on Jewish culture and letters in the beginning of the twentieth century.
Hayyim Nahman Bialik and Shmuel Yosef Agnon are the two masters of Modern Hebrew Literature--Bialik in verse and Agnon in prose.
Hayyim Nahman Bialik and Shmuel Yosef Agnon alike exerted a profound influence on their literary contemporaries and successors to the present day.
This literature represented a highly refined aesthetic renewal as well, nowhere more in evidence than in the poetry of Hayyim Nahman Bialik and the prose fiction of Shmuel Yosef Agnon.