Hazlitt


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Hazlitt

William. 1778--1830, English critic and essayist: works include Characters of Shakespeare's Plays (1817), Table Talk (1821), and The Plain Speaker (1826)
References in periodicals archive ?
It is also, through Coleridge, Wordsworth, Lamb, Byron, Hunt, Hazlitt, Keats, and a host of other period voices, a history of theatrical criticism as well as theatrical practice; and the particular insight about illegitimacy as a destabilizing phenomenon gathers persuasive force in part because it is teased out from contemporary sources, notably second generation commentators like Hazlitt who can be invoked on behalf of the illegitimate stage even as they prove ambivalent in ways that cannily recapitulate (and therefore undo) the distinction between first and second generation Romantic writing.
In this regard, Hazlitt and Yeager, following David Hume and Ludwig von Mises before them, contend that the relevant criterion is social cooperation, which refers to peaceful interaction between individuals.
The radical essayist William Hazlitt was a "key figure controlling the transmission of the idea of literary originality" in the period (Macfarlane 34), as exemplified in his literary lectures and his collection of essays on contemporary cultural and political figures, The Spirit of the Age (1825).
In an essay about a fight, quite unrelated to Dante, Hazlitt describes one of the opponents as "like a preternatural, spectral appearance, or like one of the figures of Dante's Inferno" (Hazlitt 9 70), while Hunt compares a dream in The Faerie Queene to "a frightful, hideous dream, from the Italian [poet]" (Hunt 4 51).
The metaphors in these lines--the explicit "mower" and the submerged "quaffing"--recall Hazlitt's essay "On the Feeling of Immortality in Youth": "we quaff the cup of life with eager thirst without draining it, and joy and hope seem ever mantling to the brim," for "objects press around us," Hazlitt explains, "filling the mind with their magnitude and with the throng of desires that wait upon them, so that there is no room for the thoughts of death" (Selected Essays of William Hazlitt 1778-1830, ed.
He went on to Swift, Wordsworth, Byron and other Romantics, but observed that Hazlitt was "my guide", adding: "For him the paths of politics and literature crossed and re-crossed in an endless interweaving.
Looking at today's MPs I'm reminded of the words of writer William Hazlitt, "The idea (fear) of what the public will think prevents the public from ever thinking at all, and acts as a spell on the exercise of private judgement.
Hazlitt 'took political sketch-writing to a new level'.
The Spring 2009 issue of Nineteenth-Century Prose (Volume 36, Number 1) is a special issue on William Hazlitt, guest-edited by James Mulvihili, who will join the Editorial Board of this journal beginning with the next issue.
Wardle suggests that the shift of focus to acting was a result of "electrifying" (Wardle 22) performances (for example, William Hazlitt was particularly excited by Edmund Kean), however, Gray, again, emphasizes the slow process of this development (23).
Fru Hazlitt and Richard Eyre to leave GCap Media plc