household

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household

‘a single person or a group of people who have the address as their only or main residence and who either share one meal a day or share living accommodation’ (The Office of Population Censuses and Surveys). Nonrelated members are problematic in this definition, and sociologists have used two main types of household composition in discussing households:
  1. those based on the familial structure of the household, which identify the number, size and types of family in that household;
  2. those based on the age and sex structure, which identify the numbers of children, adults and, sometimes, people of pensionable age in the household.

The CENSUS uses both of these types. Different versions of the second type are used in the FAMILY EXPENDITURE SURVEY and the GENERAL HOUSEHOLD SURVEY. In the Census, the selection of the HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD is left to respondents to choose according to the criterion of ‘chief economic supporter’.

These definitions closely relate household composition to family composition, and new types of social organization, such as flat sharing, sheltered accommodation for the elderly and student accommodation, call into question the adequacy of this type of definition. Critics have also queried the usefulness of the head of household definition since it is often assumed that a man is the head of the household regardless of the social position of any women living in the same household. See also HOMELESSNESS.

household

All persons, including family members and any unrelated persons, who occupy a dwelling unit.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the time the head of the household has reached 65, and they are more likely to be mortgage-free and have seen their children fly the nest, annual living costs are estimated to have dropped to around PS25,000 a year.
76plus] Individuals who are head of the household and between the age cohort of 76+ years old.
In addition, the researcher used three indicators of social control mechanisms that might affect men's sexual behavior: rural or urban residence (because social control mechanisms are presumably weaker in urban regions), travel away from home in the past 12 months, and social position in the household, determined by whether the man lived alone, headed a two-person household, headed a larger household, was the son or grandson of the head of the household, or was in another position.
Stevens and Schaller found that in families in which the head of the household has a high school degree or less, the effects on children's academic achievement are particularly significant; the probability of grade repetition increases by nearly 1 percentage point in such households.
Matthew Anderton, the head of the household, was Mayor of Chester in 1703 and it is believed the pit was filled in the early 18th century, when the house was cleared after he died in 1709.
The records show the name, age, place of birth, marital status, and occupation of every resident in every home, as well as their relationship to the head of the household.
She noted that, to be accepted for the program, the head of the household should be seeking employment throughout the application process.
We have taken industry of the head of the household as a proxy for the industry of the household as a whole.
While Mary's husband was still acting as head of the household when Jesus stayed behind in the Temple at age twelve, Joseph is never mentioned again thereafter, though he might have been expected to accompany his wife and the other children when the whole family went to confront their eccentric relative while he was preaching (Luke 4:42, Mark 3:31-35).
The reader will learn how to identify the relationships she needs to end, improve the relation ships she hopes to keep, and let her husband be the head of the household without losing herself in the process.
To be head of the household - Coral: 9-4 Lisa, 4 Ray, 9-2 Nush, Scott, Steph, 6 Cameron.
In fact, as Elizabeth knew from her own alleged support of Thomas Wyatt's revolt in 1554 against her sister, Mary Tudor, and from her imprisonment of Mary, queen of Scots, after her for ced abdication and flight to England, all the marriages of sixteenth-century British queens regnant, both to natives and to foreigners, led to rebellions against their governments principally because contemporaries believed that their husbands, as the head of the household, would naturally become their realms' actual rulers.