HAMR

(redirected from Heat-assisted magnetic recording)
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HAMR

(Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording) A technique from Seagate for increasing the density of bits on magnetic disks by using a more stable recording medium. In order to write the bit into this medium, a laser heats the area momentarily. HAMR density of one trillion bits per square inch is expected to yield drives with 20, 40 and more terabytes of capacity. See superparamagnetic limit and perpendicular recording.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specific topics include modulation coding for a two-dimensional optical storage channel, characterization of heat-assisted magnetic recording channels, Cramer-Rao bound for timing recovery on channels with inter-symbol interference, the faithful communication of genetic information, an information theoretic approach to data storage and processing in cells, coding for optical communications, and macro-molecular data storage with such features as highly parallel read and write operations and three-dimensional storage capacity.
At that point, researchers will again confront the need for new technology to increase storage density, and Seagate plans to turn to a technique called heat-assisted magnetic recording.
Ohno is looking at an alternative to heat-assisted magnetic recording to get around what he says is the difficulty of localizing heat to sufficiently small areas.