aircraft

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aircraft

any machine capable of flying by means of buoyancy or aerodynamic forces, such as a glider, helicopter, or aeroplane
www.aerospaceweb.org/aircraft/index.shtml

aircraft

[′er‚kraft]
(aerospace engineering)
Any structure, machine, or contrivance, especially a vehicle, designed to be supported by the air, either by the dynamic action of the air upon the surfaces of the structure or object or by its own buoyancy. Also known as air vehicle.

Aircraft

Any vehicle which carries one or more persons and which navigates through the air. The two main classifications of aircraft are lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air. The term lighter-than-air is applied to all aircraft which sustain their weight by displacing an equal weight of air, for example, blimps and dirigibles. Heavier-than-air craft are supported by giving the surrounding air a momentum in the downward direction equal to the weight of the aircraft. See Airplane, Helicopter

aircraft

Any structure, vehicle, or machine designed to travel through air supported by its own buoyancy or by the action of air on its surfaces. It includes airplanes, gliders, helicopters, and balloons. It does not include hovercraft, which obtain their lift from the reaction of air against the earth's surface. ICAO defines aircraft as “any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reaction of the air other than the reaction of the air against the earth's surface.” Aircraft has also been defined as “device(s) that are used or intended to be used for flight in the air, and when used in air traffic control terminology, may include the flight crew” (“AIM,” FAA).
References in periodicals archive ?
Both events showcased the increasing capabilities and safety of heavier-than-air flight.
Apparently he used the area for his flying experiments in the 1890s, killed in 1899 in the 'Hawk', said to have made the first, heavier-than-air flight.
Simon Newcomb, an eminent mathematician and astronomer and founding member of the American Astronomical Society, argued that powered heavier-than-air flight was a practical impossibility.
Some aviation historians say that this bird-inspired control mechanism was the pivotal innovation that enabled the Wright brothers to achieve heavier-than-air flight whereas others pursuing that same goal had failed.
Army officers, that the world was on the threshold of practical heavier-than-air flight.
19) to the pursuit of controlled heavier-than-air flight.
Heavier-than-air flight presented special problems: the two most significant being the need for a powerful and reliable, yet very light, motor; and a method for maintaining directional control.