heavy bomber

(redirected from Heavy bombers)

heavy bomber

[′hev·ē ′bäm·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
Any large bomber considered to be relatively heavy, such as a bomber having a gross weight, including bomb load, of 250,000 pounds (113,000 kilograms) or more, as the B-36 and the B-52.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the five-year campaign, British Bomber Command's bombers and (later) American heavy bombers unloaded 1.
We experienced a lot of wartime flying, both heavy bombers built by AWA and also fighter aircraft.
The son of a Tyneside marine engineer, Norman enlisted in the RAF during World War Two and became the captain of various heavy bombers ( Wellingtons and Lancasters ( across Europe.
As day broke, American heavy bombers dropped 3,000 tons of bombs on the shore defences during the 30 minutes preceding the landings.
Meanwhile,as US heavy bombers paved their way eastwards on the first Italy to Russia shuttle raid, the German forces were reported to have sent up a captured Flying Fortress to join the formation.
research facilities were in many respects inferior to those available to European powers and only American heavy bombers and transports were at the state-of-the-art in comparison to other nations, thanks to Boeing's persistence in the large airplane field.
The new aerial force will be lead by 50 combat planes, a mixture of Tornado GR4s heavy bombers and Harrier GR7 ground attack jets.
The appointment of Sir Arthur Harris, who took over Bomber Command in 1942, and the build-up of the strike force of heavy bombers such as the Lancaster, changed the course of the war.
These heavy bombers expended more than 80 percent of the tonnage dropped thus far, according to Air Force officials.
As heavy bombers continued to pound Taliban frontlines, the Northern Alliance staged a show of strength but there was no mention of when the major offensive it has promised will come.
Heavy bombers last night launched the most devastating assault yet on Taliban front lines as US public opinion called for the war effort to be stepped up.