Hebrides

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Hebrides

 

an archipelago, part of Great Britain, in the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Scotland and comprising approximately 500 islands, of which about 100 are inhabited. Total area, 7,500 sq km.

The Outer Hebrides are separated from the Inner Hebrides by the straits of The Minch and the Little Minch and by the Sea of the Hebrides. The Inner Hebrides include the islands of Skye, Mull, Islay, Jura, and Rum. The terrain consists mainly of rugged hilly and low mountain country (200-600 m), typically of Cenozoic effusive rock. On the islands of Skye and Mull individual cone-shaped peaks rise above the volcanic plateaus—for example, in the Cuillin Hills on Skye, which reach 1,009 m. In the Outer Hebrides, which include the islands of Lewis, North Uist, South Uist, and Barra, socle lowlands predominate (100-150 m), consisting primarily of Archaean rock (mostly gneiss). In some places there are small massifs rising to a height of 799 m and often containing Paleozoic intrusions. There are many traces of the Pleistocene glaciation, such as troughs, cirques and boulder belts. The islands have a damp maritime climate with average July temperatures of 12°-14° C and average January temperatures of 4°-6° C; annual precipitation is between 1,000 and 2,000 mm. The meadow soils consist of coarse humic and peaty turf. Steep, bare slopes are the rule, but now and then birch groves and heath may be seen, and peat bogs cover the gentler slopes. The population is engaged mainly in fishing and cattle breeding. Tweed manufacture and the tourist industry are also important.

L. R. SEREBRIANNYI

References in periodicals archive ?
If I can satisfy the European Commission, it would be my intention to scrap future tendering processes for the Clyde and Hebrides Ferry Services contract and directly appoint CalMac.
QinetiQ, operating Ministry of Defence (MOD) Hebrides Range as part of the Long Term Partnering Agreement (LTPA), managed the command and control centre, as well as the logistics and safety for what was the most complex exercise of its type ever conducted in the UK.
Paul Murton, BBC presenter and Hebrides enthusiast, touches on these.
In what he calls essentially a series of case studies, MacCoinnich examines five different groups of people, both native and stranger and from both within and beyond the region, who competed to control resources on Lewis and other islands of the Northern Hebrides off the west coast of Scotland.
Situated on Europe's Atlantic edge, the Outer Hebrides are a diverse chain of inter-connected islands with their own unique way of life and an abundant assortment of attractions and entertainment.
Raisco is currently working on five jobs, totalling more than PS700,000, at Bude in the South West, Taunton in Somerset, Sterling in Scotland and North Uist in the Outer Hebrides, as well as another contract nearer to home in Newcastle.
Among its current contracts is a 135-tonne school building project in the Outer Hebrides for Robertson Construction - work that proved challenging given the impact of ferry strikes limiting crossings from mainland Scotland.
Luing cattle are a beef breed developed on the island of Luing in the Inner Hebrides.
Also included in the work are stories of a Blyth man who built a boat and discovered the New Hebrides, a local potter who built a full size prehistoric animal and life-size kings and queens for two black and white silent films in Hollywood, and the Cambois miner who captured his experiences as a gunner in the First World War in pencil in a small pocket diary later discovered by his grandson.
Docherty said: "It has long been my ambition to work with the ferry services that serve the Clyde and Hebrides routes.
Mike Cantlay, Chairman of VisitScotland, said: 'The Inner and Outer Hebrides have given a wonderful backdrop for our Year of Natural Scotland 2013 campaign, which has been boosted enormously by the Hebrides: Island on the Edge programme.