Maritsa

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Maritsa

(märē`tsä), river, c.300 mi (480 km) long, rising in the Rila Mts., W Bulgaria, and flowing SE between the Balkans and Rhodope Mts., past Plovdiv, to Edirne, Turkey, where it turns south to enter the Aegean Sea near Enez. The Tundzha is its chief tributary. The Maritsa's lower course forms part of the Bulgarian-Greek border and the Greek-Turkish line. The upper Maritsa valley is a principal east-west route in Bulgaria. The unnavigable river is used for power production and irrigation. It is known as the Évros by the Greeks and the Meriç by the Turks.

Maritsa

 

a river in the Balkan Peninsula, mostly in Bulgaria but its lower course is the boundary between Greece and Turkey. Length, 525 km; basin area, about 55,000 sq km. It begins in the Rila Mountains, flows across the Thracian lowlands, breaks through spurs of the eastern Rhodope Mountains, and flows into the Aegean Sea, forming a swampy delta. The river is primarily rain-fed and becomes very shallow in the summer. It is used for irrigation and hydroelectric power. The river is navigable from Edirne to the sea. Cities on the Maritsa are Pazardzhik, Plovdiv, and Dimitrovgrad (Bulgaria) and Edirne (Turkey).

Maritsa

a river in S Europe, rising in S Bulgaria and flowing east into Turkey, then south from Edirne as part of the border between Turkey and Greece to the Aegean. Length: 483 km (300 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
The PSI-led team's work documents the geomorphology of Hebrus Valles, a Martian terrain that is unique in that it preserves pristine landforms located at the terminal reaches of a Martian outflow channel.
Rodriguez and his co-authors propose that large volumes of catastrophic floodwaters, which participated in the excavation of Hebrus Valles, may have encountered their ultimate fate in vast cavernous systems.
Cupid may be the instigator of her dilemma, but the means he uses to create this situation are embodied in the athletic Hebrus.
She is quite aware that her fascination with Hebrus is focused exclusively on his physicality.
3) With an unmistakeable imitation of the final lines of Virgil's depiction of Orpheus's singing head going down the River Hebrus where it will eventually be found washed up on the island of Lesbos and worshipped, Garcilaso has Elisa offer consolation to Nemoroso:
Words are made of air and it is to air that they will return, a concept which of course reminds us both of Orpheus's singing head drifting down the River Hebrus calling out the name of Eurydice and of Nemoroso's disembodied voice in Garcilaso's Third Eclogue calling out Elisa, Elisa as it passes down the River Tagus to Lisbon and beyond.
He was torn limb from limb by maniacs and his head and lyre thrown into the river Hebrus.
So deep and abiding is his music, his head, floating down the Hebrus still sings potently enough to soothe the waves.