Hecatomb


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Hecatomb

 

an ancient Greek sacrifice, originally consisting of 100 oxen; later “hecatomb” came to mean any major public sacrifice. Hecatombs were offered in Athens during the most important holiday, Panathenaea, which was celebrated during the month of Hekatombaion (late July and early August). In the figurative sense, the term “hecatomb” denotes the many victims of war, terror, an epidemic, and the like.

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Hitler survived the hecatomb by closeting himself in the Fuhrerbunker with his longtime mistress, Eva Braun, and his Nazi family of military and civilian retainers.
With the battlefield news uniformly grim, with the battle of the Somme swallowing up men by the hecatomb, and with 100,000 tons of shipping lost every month to German U-boats, radical measures were clearly called for.
The ecological disaster allegorizes the disappearance of the other insofar as the world of humans was a geography of "intermediation," "other people"'s home; the environmental catastrophe was also a hecatomb of the other.
The meaning of speech, then, requires that before any word is spoken, there must be a sort of immense hecatomb, a preliminary flood plunging all of creation into a total sea.
Liddell Hart referred to him as the "Mahdi of mass and mutual massacre" whose belief in the necessity of slaughter led to the hecatomb of the Great War.
Civilization is sickened by the hecatomb of September 11; its enemies are emboldened by it.
Heberto Padilla, however famous he became, and for however brief a time, was only one among this hecatomb.
When you getup from the pastures, like a shepherd(ess)" (line 23) is thus strongly ironic: she pretends to be a protector of the flocks, but she causes a hecatomb among domestic animals.
An immense hecatomb, even in the areas of "cultivation" called the Vallies.
A combination of the "end of the work" with the social Darwinism of the market can be explosive, leading us to a social hecatomb of unknown proportions.
I spoke at dizzy speed of those so recent experiences of mine, of Auschwitz nearby, yet, it seemed, unknown to all, of the hecatomb from which I alone had escaped, of everything.
He went on, even more astonishingly: "One can properly understand these tears only against the backcloth of great tragic events: the immense hecatomb brought about by the war; the extermination of the sons and daughters of Israel; the threat to Europe coming from atheistic communism.