Hecuba


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Hecuba

(hĕk`yo͝obə), in Greek mythology, chief wife of Priam, king of Troy. Hecuba bore to Priam 19 children, including Paris, Hector, Troilus, Cassandra, and others who were prominent in the Trojan War. To save Polydorus, her youngest son, from the Greeks, Hecuba sent him to Polymnestor, king of Thrace. After the sack of Troy she was allotted to Odysseus, who on his way home stopped at Thrace. Learning there that Polymnestor had murdered Polydorus, Hecuba, in revenge, blinded the king and killed his children. She is an important character in Euripides' plays Hecuba and The Trojan Women.

Hecuba

mourns the death of her children. [Gk. Drama: Benét, 450]
See: Grief

Hecuba

kills Polymestor’s children and blinds him for his treacherous murder of her son Polydorus. [Gk. Drama: Euripides Hecuba in Benét, 450]
References in periodicals archive ?
In her version of Hecuba, the widowed Trojan queen dealing with the aftermath of war is not the brutal, violent woman portrayed in the original story by Euripides but instead a strong-willed, dignified (and terrified) woman who will do anything to save her children.
rom left, Queen Anne, the second new play to premiere at The Swan; The return of Wendy and Peter Pan and Hecuba, all wonderful treats instore for theatre lovers at the RSC during the winter season
will have ceded all these delights for nothing, for Hecuba, as Hamlet
Denethor then takes his fevered son to the Tombs, where he places him on a pyre and intends to set fire to their bodies together, thus collapsing the Trojan roles of both Oenone and Hecuba at Paris' death: "He lies within," Denethor tells Gandalf, "burning, already burning.
While the Thracian Chersonese is the setting of Euripides' tragedy Hecuba (lines 6-9), the location has no reality in the Homeric context, nor in Offenbach.
According to the circumstances, the orator assigned to commemorate a woman's situation could draw analogies to the beauty of Helen or Aphrodite, the lamentations of the Trojan Hecuba, the valor and dedication of Spartan mothers, or the protectiveness of Cornelia, mother of the Gracchi (Wyatt-Brown, Southern 93).
Their topics include performing the name in Sophocles' Electra, the Persian War Tetralogy of Aeschylus, Astrateia and Lipostration on the Attic comic stage, law and spectacle in Euripides' Hecuba, and Athenian drama and democratic political culture.
As Bremer reported, Hosmer was fully engaged in working on her statues Hecuba, Daphne, Sleeping Girl, and Puck.
In his dedicatory letter to the Earl of Pembroke, Heywood compares his task of rendering Seneca's play into English to Erasmus's achievement in translating Euripides' Hecuba and Iphigenia into Latin.
I have acted in the Yeats version of Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus, I have directed the Frank McGuinness version of Euripides' Hecuba, and I have devoted considerable critical attention to Seamus Heaney's version of Sophocles' Philoctetes, aptly named The Cure At Troy.
Cassandra, in Greek mythology, was the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy.
As the player notes, even the gods who rarely are moved by the human drama would have been affected by the cries of Hecuba.