Heimskringla


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Heimskringla

medieval account of the kings of Norway from legendary times to the twelfth century. [Norw. Hist.: Haydn & Fuller, 322]
See: Epic
References in periodicals archive ?
102-103), the mer-dog's story is based on the "Saga of King Olaf Trygvesson" in Snorri Sturlason's Heimskringla.
Three of these are based on holidays mentioned in Ynglinga saga, the first story in Snorri Sturlusson's mammoth thirteenth-century history of the kings of Norway, Heimskringla.
The Old Norse Heimskringla is contrasted with the Latin Gesta Danorum, but one of the salient points Bagge makes is that "the retreat of the author and the focus on dramatic narrative do not make the sagas more 'popular' or less 'learned' than contemporary Latin works" (p.
The topics include the transformation of literary genres in Iceland from orality to literacy, dreams in the sagas, ideology and structure in Heimskringla, the double scene of Arrow-Oddr's drinking contest, and a structural approach to the Riddles of the Rok-Stone.
There is evidence from Heimskringla that the remnants of Harald Hardrada's army re-embarked on their ships at Spurn Head following their defeat at the Battle of Stamford Bridge (1066) (King Harald's Saga Ch.
Plans for the translation of Heimskringla were already in existence in May 1872, as demonstrated by Morris's letters to Magnusson of 23 May 1872, ibid.
Among Icelandic texts, in addition to Njals saga, accounts of the battle are found in Orkneyinga saga and Porsteins saga Sidu-Hallssonar; and there is a reference to it in Snorri Sturluson's Olafs saga Helga in Heimskringla, where it is described as `Brjansorrostu' (`Brian's battle').
The most famous of the Sturlungs today is one of Sturla's sons, Snorri Sturluson, the author of the Heimskringla, the Poetic Edda, and probably the Egil's Saga.
The Heimskringla, a chronicle of the Norse Kings which was composed before 1241, refers to King Canute the Great's passion for chess.
The "Saga of Hakon the Broadshouldered" in Heimskringla relates that "he had the sword in his possession all his life, and after him, his son; and then one after the other of his kinsfolk had it.
Much was already written in the Winnipeg papers, in particular Logberg and Heimskringla, as well as in the calendar Almanak Olafs S.