Glarean

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Glarean

 

(Glareanus; pseudonym of Heinrich Loris; also Loritus, Loriti). Born June 1488, in Mollis, canton of Glarus; died Mar. 28, 1563, in Freiburg. Swiss humanist scholar, music theoretician, and educator.

Glarean began to study at the University of Cologne in 1506, and in 1510 he became a master of arts. He taught at the universities of Basel (in 1514 and from 1522) and Paris (1517-22). In 1529 he became a professor of poetics at Freiburg. Glarean was an erudite scholar. His articles on music exercised considerable influence on the development of music theory and are an important source for modern music scholars. Glarean’s main musical treatise is the Dodecachordon (1547). He broadened the system of modes, adding four new modes to the medieval eight. In his modal system he distinguished two main modes—the Ionian (major) and the Aeolian (minor)—which were widespread in musical practice (especially popular) but not admitted by conservative musicians. The Italian Renaissance composer and musical scholar G. Zarlino developed Glarean’s system.

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As a further example, Iain Fenlon tells, in his essay "Hernando Colon, Heinrich Glarean and others" (p.
But Zarlino's book includes a curious twist: in the tenor partbook each piece gets a modal label, in this case using the pseudo-Greek terminology pioneered just two years earlier by Heinrich Glarean (1488-1563) in his great codification of the twelve modes, the Dodecachordon (Basel: Henricus Petri, 1547; reprint, New York: Broude Bros.
Iain Fenlon reconstructs, in turn, the library of the music theorist and humanist Heinrich Glarean, in which classical texts are paramount.
Petrucci provides only a text incipit, "Sic unda impellitur unda," and Drake notes concordances in music treatises by Sebald Heyden (De arte canendi [Nuremberg: Johan Petreius, 1540; reprint, New York: Broude, 1969]) and Heinrich Glarean (Dodekachordon [Basel: Heinrich Petri, 1547; reprints, New York: Broude, 1967; Hildesheim: G.
The editor's own contribution to this anthology, "Sic ego te dilegetion," analyzes the homonymous motet attributed to Josquin des Prez by Heinrich Glarean.
Kurtzman's modal analyses, which draw on the Renaissance tradition of Heinrich Glarean and Gioseffo Zarlino, seem at first to create something of a procrustean bed for Monteverdi's music.
Didactic music theorists worked in the prosperous and academic environment of Basle, acquiring libraries that lain Fenlon uses as evidence of their broad and humanistic learning (Beatus Rhenanus, 1485-1547: 760 volumes of more than a thousand works; Heinrich Glarean 1487-1563: 74 identified volumes of a much larger collection, plus 21 of his own publications).
Among the more popular titles published by Petreius, indicating again the diversity of his musikalisches Opfer, were Hans Newsidler's Ein newgeordent kunstlich Lautenbuch (RISM 1536[12,13]), the Liber quindecim missarum (RISM 1539[1]), the first and second parts of Georg Forster's so-called Frische teutsche Liedlein (RISM 1539[27], 1540[21]), Forster's Selectissimarum mutetarum (RISM 1540[6]), the Trium vocum cantiones centum (RISM 1541[2]), and Sebald Heyden's De arte canendi of 1540, the treatise on which Heinrich Glarean relied heavily as he assembled music examples for his monumental Dodecachordon.
Interesting figures, including Ludwig Senfl, Heinrich Glarean, the Baifs (pere et fils), Marsilio Ficino, Pontus de Tyard, Giovanni de' Bardi, Ottavio Rinuccini, Thomas Morley, Richard Pace, Gabriel Harvey, Edmund Spenser, Philip Sidney, and even William Shakespeare make brief appearances in these chapters, often illustrated by poetic or music examples.