hierarchy

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hierarchy:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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 and orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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.

Hierarchy

An arrangement or system of ranking one above the other or arranged in a graded series or sequence such as size (large to small), shape (similar or dissimilar), and placement (emphasis or location).

Hierarchy

 

the ordering of parts or elements of a whole from the highest to the lowest.

The term “hierarchy” was introduced not earlier than the second half of the fifth century by Pseudo-Dionysius in his treatises The Celestial Hierarchy and The Ecclesiastical Hierarchy. Until the 19th century, it was used to describe the organization of the Christian church. The development of the conception of hierarchy in science began in the second half of the 19th century. In the social sciences, the conception of hierarchy was originally used to describe class-estate divisions in an antagonistic society (for example, feudal hierarchy) and to characterize the structure of authority, especially of bureaucracy. In contemporary bourgeois sociology, numerous research studies have been devoted to the hierarchy of prestige, the hierarchy of wealth, and the hierarchy of power and control as an expression of social stratification and of social inequality.

With the appearance of the general systems theory in the 20th century, the conception of hierarchy was applied to describe any system objects. Hierarchically organized forms exist in all spheres of objective reality: inorganic, biological, and social. In Marxist philosophy, the idea of the hierarchy of qualitatively irreducible structural levels of matter has been developed. In general organizational theory, hierarchy is seen as the principle of control that secures the effective functioning of the organization. The hierarchy of levels (tiers) of a language is distinguished in linguistics. In graph theory the hierarchically constructed graph (the so-called tree) is used.

L. A. SEDOV

hierarchy

1. Religion a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
2. Taxonomy a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc.
3. Linguistics Maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element
4. government by an organized priesthood

hierarchy

An organisation with few things, or one thing, at the top and with several things below each other thing. An inverted tree structure. Examples in computing include a directory hierarchy where each directory may contain files or other directories; a hierarchical network (see hierarchical routing), a class hierarchy in object-oriented programming.

hierarchy

A structure that has a predetermined ordering from high to low. For example, all files and folders on the hard disk are organized in a hierarchy (see Win Folder organization).
References in periodicals archive ?
that paid attention to the outcomes including the heirarchy system of the
schools through the conscious or unconscious acceptance of a racial heirarchy, where whites are consistently ranked above People of Color.
At the uppermost level of this heirarchy, the targeted activity is viewed in terms of how the individual or subject (e.
Discrimination training for persons with developmental disabilities: A comparison of the task demonstration model and the standard prompting heirarchy.
Gaio fervently believed that Portuguese power in Asia could be revived, first by extending the work of the missionaries under the Portuguese Padroado Real and strengthening the organization of the ecclesiastical heirarchy accordingly, so as to enable the missionaries to operate more effectively, and second by securing Portuguese domination of navigation and commerce in the Indian Ocean and beyond.
Will there be a currency in new language to describe the archetypes and prototypes of idealized human types much as racism's proponents once made skin colour one of the codes to identify an elaborate, imagined heirarchy of human attributes and liabilities?
Although they describe the system in its final phases, we nevertheless learn a great deal about how the mature system worked- and we encounter quite a few surprises along the way, such as the vacuum that paralyzed the Party during Chernenko, and the surprising role of regional Party officials in bolstering Gorbachev's minority position within the Party heirarchy.
One of the misapprehensions about the movement that Sanyal clears up is the notion that heirarchy precludes individual responsibility.
If Webster is correct when he argues, in this volume, that hapu were integral to nineteenth century capitalist development in New Zealand and that their transformations responded to wider economic processes then it would seem that the reification of hapu as sub-tribes within a static heirarchy, evident in the writings of Elsdon Best, Te Rangi Hiroa and Apirana Ngata, paralleled and reinforced the traditionalisation of the meeting house.
There was of course the universal "Lili Marlene" - surprisingly this most popular song of the Second World War was officially banned by the Nazi heirarchy as too "mushy".
No abundance of false labels," he concluded, "will establish the witless heirarchy that Mr.
Several countries of the region have amended their constitutions to grant to the international agreements, in general,(37) and to the treaties on human rights matters, in particular,(38) a special and higher heirarchy with respect to ordinary laws -- even equating them with their own constitutions.