Heisenberg


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Related to Heisenberg: Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

Heisenberg

Werner Karl . 1901--76, German physicist. He contributed to quantum mechanics and formulated the uncertainty principle (1927): Nobel prize for physics 1932
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be the group of the semi-direct product of the Heisenberg [H.
I wanted to suggest with `Copenhagen' that there is some kind of parallel between the indeterminacy of human thinking and the indeterminacy that Heisenberg introduced into physics with his famous uncertainty principle.
Bohr, Heisenberg and Bohr's wife, Margarethe, are brought before us as ghosts to analyse their motives and their morals in a riveting discourse, all of it played out in a dissecting theatre with the audience on stage.
The question that repeatedly has been asked and argued is: Did these scientists led by Heisenberg know how to make an atomic bomb?
Einstein resolutely opposed the interpretations of Bohr and Heisenberg.
But Heisenberg first came up with the idea in a slightly different fashion using slightly different mathematics.
has expanded upon his previous biography on Werner Heisenberg in this new book that explores this noted scientist's involvement with the development of the atomic bomb.
Then, in 1927, Werner Heisenberg, a physicist only twenty-five years old but already of international renown, set down a piece of scientific reasoning that was in equal measure simple, subtle, and startling.
Historians have been divided as to whether Heisenberg and his team were sincerely trying to construct a nuclear weapon, or whether their failure reflected a desire not to succeed because they did not want the Nazi regime to have such a weapon.
I didn't bank on how many people know about the tale of Heisenberg and (Niels) Bohr and are fascinated and intrigued by it.
But this is what Michael Frayn achieved with his play Copenhagen, an imaginative reconstruction of the actual meeting between the distinguished German physicist Werner Heisenberg and his Danish counterpart Nils Bohr in 1941.
Lodge was similarly unhappy with what he was hearing young quantum physicists like Bohr and Heisenberg say about the fundamentally discrete, quantized nature of an phenomena.