Helen and Paris

Helen and Paris

their elopement caused the Trojan war. [Gk. Myth.: Century Classical, 525–528, 815–817]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Benioff-Petersen 2004 movie Troy is the latest in a series of films that feature the world famous lovers Helen and Paris.
At the time of this writing, Troy (2004), scripted by David Benioff and directed by Wolfgang Petersen, is the latest in a series of films that feature the world famous lovers Helen and Paris.
383-420, 421-47) with two episodes in Troy: the sequence that introduces Helen and Paris and the scene in Paris' bedroom following the same duel.
The attraction between Helen and Paris is made palpable.
For those who do not know this story, the intimate setting and the looks that pass between Helen and Paris tell of their attraction and intimacy.
In Benioff's script, Helen and Paris are not in her bedroom but on a terrace overlooking the sea; Helen rebuffs Paris' overtures; and their desire is conveyed, following a more innocent and romantic convention, through their looking together at the moon.
It shows Helen and Paris as victims of passion more than as loving.
Petersen locates his episode soon after Helen and Paris meet, and its purpose is to show how two people of royal standing would elope despite the dire and predictable consequences.
Both Wise's and Harrison's films show Helen and Paris not only when they first meet and fall in love but also ten years later, after the long siege of Troy and its attendant suffering.
The need to fit the love between Helen and Paris to the Hollywood fantasy also governs Petersen's adaptation of the meeting in Paris' bedchamber after Paris' unheroic performance in the duel with Menelaus.
In this, she mines the Trojan War characters and events, concentrating on Helen and Paris, as seen by a young girl, Anaxandra.
From KLIATT's July 2002 book review: "In this [Cooney] mines the Trojan War characters and events, concentrating on Helen and Paris, as seen by a young girl, Anaxandra.