Heliacal


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Related to Heliacal: Heliacal setting

Heliacal

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Heliacal means associated with the Sun (from the Greek helios, meaning “sun”). The heliacal rising of a star is its first appearance following a period of invisibility due to its conjunction with the Sun. Similarly, the heliacal setting of a star refers to its last appearance before entering into a conjunction with the Sun.

References in periodicals archive ?
Egyptians therefore held their New Year celebration at the time of this heliacal rising of Sirius.
Since Sirius "begins its heliacal rise to reach its akme" in the month of Tir (June 21-July 21), "one of the most torrid months of the year in Iran" (p.
Julius Caesar held that the heliacal rising of the Pleiades (meaning the first date each year when they could be seen in the east before sunrise) marked the beginning of summer.
Luft's analysis shows that this festival was dated by the lunar calendar and occurred before the heliacal rising of Sothis.
In traditional Maori society, a watchful eye is kept on the evening sky following the heliacal rising of Matariki to spot the appearance of the next new Moon.
The line coincides with summer solstice on Mars 500,000 years ago, and the same vista incorporates the heliacal rising of Earth.
The ancient Egyptians marked the start of their new year by the heliacal rising (first appearance in the glow of sunrise) of Sirius.
Because the count was roughly a quarter-day short of the true length of the year, the heliacal rising of Sirius drifted through the solar calendar and did not recur on the first day of the year until 1,461 of those 365-day years had elapsed.
the heliacal rising (in the eastern skies) to an astrologer.
Other sources give the date of discovery in 1006 as May 1st and of heliacal setting as November 26th, adding the detail that the star was located in the 3rd degree east of Di - a measure of right ascension.
They assigned that seasonally significant heliacal rising to July 3rd, the eve of American Independence Day.
These chunks of computer instructions can be included in earlier programs - for telescopic limiting magnitudes (S&T: November 1989, page 522), heliacal rising (S&T: September 1985, page 261), lunar occultations (S&T: January 1993, page 89), and extinction angles (S&T: April 1987, page 426) - to yield more accurate results.