tobacco budworm

(redirected from Helicoverpa armigera)
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Related to Helicoverpa armigera: Spodoptera exigua, cotton bollworm, Cydia pomonella, Plutella xylostella

tobacco budworm

[tə‚bak·ō ′bəd‚wərm]
(invertebrate zoology)
The larva of a noctuid moth, Heliothis virescens, that damages the buds and young leaves of tobacco.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies were conducted at The International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Asia Region, (ICRISAT) during 1999-2000, on the male nocturnal moth, Helicoverpa armigera, to examine the trapping effectiveness of the "ICRISAT Dry Funnel" pheromone trap design.
Using genetic engineering techniques, a team of Australian researchers has created plant cells which produce a virus that kills a costly agricultural pest, Helicoverpa armigera, the cotton bollworm.
for plant disease control and a Salmonella-based rat poison), a number of fungal-based products (especially Trichoderma, Beauveria and Metarhizium products) and entomopathogenic viruses (notably Helicoverpa armigera NPV and Spodoptera litura NPV).
saccharalis pupae at 25[degrees]C, which is a greater number of progeny per host pupa than the number it produced on Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) pupae, i.
Market Analysis III-57 Current and Future Analysis III-57 Biopesticides Gain Traction in Brazil Spurred by Helicoverpa armigera Pestilence III-57 Product Approvals III-57 Strategic Corporate Development III-58 B.
Bt cotton effectively control bollwsorms, especially Helicoverpa armigera, thus preventing yield losses from an estimated damage of 30% to 60% each year in India.
1997, "Differentially regulated inhibitor sensitive and insensitive protease genes from phytophagous insect pest Helicoverpa armigera are members of complex multigene families".
It has been shown that Helicoverpa armigera moths laid more eggs on the most abundance hosts in field due to increased encounters [5].
Old world bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner), surveys were initiated in 2004 under the Indiana Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS) program.
These observations agree with those noted by Mironidis & Savopoulou-Soultani (2008), who mentioned that the development of Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner, 1808) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was faster under an alternating thermal regime (mean 25[degrees]C) than in a constant temperature (25[degrees]C).
Delayed cuticular penetration and enhanced metabolism of deltamethrin in pyrethroid resistant strains of Helicoverpa armigera from China and Pakistan.