helium-3


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helium-3

[′hē·lē·əm ′thrē]
(nuclear physics)
The isotope of helium with mass number 3, constituting approximately 1.3 parts per million of naturally occurring helium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Helium-3 is extremely rare on earth and is used in specialist MRI scanners and military sensors to detect smuggled uranium or plutonium.
Ouyang Ziyuan, head of lunar exploration, outlined plans to exploit the vast quantities of helium-3 thought to lie buried in lunar rock.
Our detector design builds on the success of a segmented helium-3 ionization chamber and a neutron MicroMegas detector.
Packard, heard a whistle from reservoirs of helium-3 separated by a sieve like membrane (SN: 8/2/97, p.
Fusion researchers have long been interested in the possibility of using the fusion of deuterium with helium-3 rather than with tritium because of the radioactivity associated with the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle.
Scientists believe they have found vast areas of Helium-3 gas, and have drawn up maps to guide Moon prospectors.
At the time of their 1972 discovery of a phenomenon called superfluidity in a rare form of helium, helium-3, Osheroff was a graduate student at Cornell.
The resource Carrier refers to is the Helium-3 isotope, which, while rare on Earth, is available on the moon.
Then, in 1972, experimenters found that a rare isotope of helium known as helium-3 also becomes a superfluid.
The article states that the "concentration of radioactive helium-3 isotopes" in rocks suggests information about the history of the rocks.
The ratio of two helium isotopes, helium-3 and helium-4, was higher in these fullerenes than in air.
The scientists studied the rotation of a single molecule of oxygen carbon sulfide (OCS) inside a tiny droplet of helium-3 at a temperature at which helium-4 is a superfluid but helium-3 is not.