Helmont


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Helmont

Jean Baptiste van . 1577--1644, Flemish chemist and physician. He was the first to distinguish gases and claimed to have coined the word gas
References in periodicals archive ?
Helmont House is located in the centre of Cardiff and features a 200-bed Premier Inn Hotel and eight floors of high quality offices accommodation.
Van Helmont says he nearly killed himself by way of carbon monoxide poisoning from burning charcoal (Partington 1989) and his research indicates that he clearly experimented with the physiological effects of the gases.
According to Johan Helmont, CEO of WTI Macedonia, Macedonia has been selected as a center of their activities in the Balkans because of the liberal market, the Macedonian laws, and the good business climate.
Van Helmont transplanted the shoot of a young willow tree into a large pot of soil.
Van Helmont (1579-1644) and Michael Ettmuller (1644-1683).
40) In early seventeenth-century Flanders, for example, Jan Baptista von Helmont argued that almost all wounds were cured by natural means and he was censured for impiety--even though Rome was moving in the same direction.
12) But it was their shared regard for toleration--in Popple's case even for Catholics--that further linked him with Van Helmont and with Locke in the 1680s and 1690s.
van Helmont "believed that frogs, slugs, and leeches were generated spontaneously" and provided directions for the generation of mice: "If a dirty shirt is stuffed into the mouth of a vessel containing wheat, within a few days, say 21, the ferment produced by the shirt, modified by the smell of the grain, transforms the wheat itself, encased in its husk, into mice.
Moran also nicely summarizes (al)chemical efforts of such luminaries as Jean Baptiste van Helmont, Nicholas Lemery, Robert Boyle, and Isaac Newton.
For example, Ficino contended that all sublunar bodies are formed by spiritus and seminal reasons that come from the world soul; for Georg Agricola, the efficient cause of minerals was linked to a seminal power; Paracelsus connected seeds not only to natural bodies and the elements, but also to the word of God; according to Jean-Baptiste Van Helmont, seeds are the containers of the final causes of natural bodies.
For instance, she derived her theory of change from Francis Mercury van Helmont and studied the works of Robert Boyle.
Biochemistry began with the discovery of wine and beer (~3500-700 BC), but the concept of "ferments" was introduced much later by Jan Baptista van Helmont (1577-1644).