Hengist

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Hengist

died ?488 ad, a leader, with his brother Horsa, of the first Jutish settlers in Britain; he is thought to have conquered Kent (?455)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of Cirith Ungol, of course, the ancient figures from myth still live, whereas Hengest is not likely to invade Hinksley in the foreseeable future.
Johnson, an independent scholar and historian, uses the methodology from his previous book, Origins of Arthurian Romance, to reconstruct the history of post-Roman Britain and the legendary figures of Hengest, Horsa, and Gwrtheyrn.
5) Scott Gwara argues that Hengest mirrors Beowulf and that the minstrel speculates that Hrothgar's new alliance with the newly adopted hero may turn out to be a failure.
And in their days Hengest and Horsa, invited by Vortigern, king of the Britons landed in Britain in a place that is called Ipwinesfleet, at first to help the Britons, but they afterwards fought against them.
If English history was to be conceived as a sequence of events that began with Hengest, history as an intellectual discipline got its true start with Alfred: "The writer of English history may be pardoned if he lingers too fondly over the figure of the king in whose court, at whose impulse, it may be in whose very words, English history begins.
31) "In his time the greatest temple in the city / Was in part tom down to be dedicated new, / For it had been honored in the days of Hengest by heathen, / Who had sent the Saxon savages over.
The Cases of Hengest and Ingeld," PQ78 (1999): 97-123.
Hro[UNKNOWN TEXT OMITTED]mund as a putative ancestor of East Anglia is compared with Hengest as a putative ancestor of Kent.
Tolkien's The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, Farmer Giles of Ham, Smith of Wootton Major, Finn and Hengest, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and many selections from Christopher Tolkien's edition of The History of Middle-earth.
Her Hengest and Horsa fuhton wip wyrtgeorne ham cyninge .
Settlers led from Bree by the Fallowhide brothers Marcho and Blanco correspond to the Anglo-Saxons Hengest and Horsa--as discussed at length by Tom Shippey in his Road to Middle-earth.