Henrik Arnold Wergeland

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Wergeland, Henrik Arnold

 

Born June 17, 1808, in Kristiansand; died July 12, 1845, in Christiania (Oslo). Norwegian poet, Journalist, and public figure. Born into the family of a pastor.

Wergeland was an ideologist of peasant democracy. His lyrical-epic poem Creation, Humanity, and Messiah (1830), filled with antityranny motifs and Utopian socialist ideas, reflected dreams of a democratic republic. In the collections Poems, First Cycle (1829) and Poems, Second Cycle (1833), he attacked European reaction and defended Polish revolutionaries, Negroes in the USA, and Norwegian workers. In the farces Oh !(1827), Parrot (1835), and The Last Clever Man (1835), published under the pseudonym of Siful Sifadda, Wergeland criticized the conservative press and reactionary romantics. He influenced H. Ibsen, B. Bjørn-son, N. Grieg, and other writers.

WORKS

Samlede skrifter, vols. 1-23. Christiania, 1918-40.
Skrifter, vols. 1-8. Oslo, 1957-62.

REFERENCES

Beyer, H. Henrik Wergeland. Oslo, 1946.
Kabell, A. Wergeland, vols. 1-2. Oslo, 1956-57.
References in periodicals archive ?
Past Var Frelsers gravlund (graveyard), posthumous home to such Norwegian literary greats as Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Wergeland, and Camilla Collett, lies Ruuds Antikvariat, a tiny bookstore for old and rare books, and a Fretex (a chain of secondhand stores owned by the Norwegian Frelsesarmeen, or Salvation Army).
Reitzels, 1877], 6: 125-28) and Henrik Wergeland (Ole Bull [Kristiania: Guldberg & Dzwonkowski, 1843]), were of the "as told to the author" type in which Haugen, following Linge, apparently suspects Bull of having planted, at the expense of strict veracity, the exaggerations useful to the creation of a commercially profitable public image.