Havelock, Sir Henry

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Havelock, Sir Henry

(hăv`lŏk), 1795–1857, British general. Entering the army in 1815, he was sent (1823) to India, where he served in the first Burma War (1824–26), the first Afghan War (1839), and the Sikh Wars (1843–49). During the Indian MutinyIndian Mutiny,
1857–58, revolt that began with Indian soldiers in the Bengal army of the British East India Company but developed into a widespread uprising against British rule in India. It is also known as the Sepoy Rebellion, sepoys being the native soldiers.
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, Havelock recaptured (July, 1857) Cawnpore (KanpurKanpur
, city (1991 pop. 2,029,889), Uttar Pradesh state, N central India, on the Ganges River. A major industrial center, it produces chemicals, textiles, leather goods, and food products. It is also a transportation hub with an airport.
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) from the rebels, but he was too late to save the British population from massacre. In Sept., 1857, he relieved Lucknow from siege, but he and his forces were then caught in the renewed siege. He died a few days after the relief of the city in November.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1880, another cousin, Sir Henry Havelock, came to the property on the condition that he changed his name to Havelock-Allan.
It was something simple as a small sheet of cloth attached to the back of a soldier's helmet and they were first introduced by Sunderland's very own Sir Henry Havelock who had the bright idea of making one in India, 1857.
He believes two plinths honouring Major General Sir Henry Havelock and General Charles James Napier are outdated.
As relief came in, in the form of troops, under the command of Major General Henry Havelock and Major General Sir James Outram, the sepoys who had rebelled were thrown back a bit.
King George IV, Major General Sir Henry Havelock, Mark Wallinger's Ecce Homo, and a waxwork of Jonny Wilkinson
One of the bronze generals he wants removed is Sir Henry Havelock, who led the 78th Highlanders with distinction.
Major-General Sir Henry Havelock was born in 1795 in Bishop wear mouth, Sunderland.
Wearsider Henry Havelock grew up to be a classic hero of the British Empire in days of the Raj.
In just seventy-five years, "the public image of the army as a moral wasteland populated by degenerate men without scruples and without religion" (22) was made over into a milieu in which officers such as Sir Henry Havelock and General Charles George "Chinese" Gordon could be celebrated as heroic "fighting Christians" (130).
The other plinths, incidentally, are occupied by statues of George IV and two generals, Henry Havelock and Sir Charles James Napier.
It is lifesize so it doesn't upstage the other petrified inhabitants of the Square: Horatio Nelson, George IV, Sir Henry Havelock and Sir Charles Napier.