Heraeum

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Heraeum

A temple or sacred enclosure dedicated to the goddess Hera.
References in periodicals archive ?
An oven for Murex Brandaris was unearthed by the excavations in Heraion Teikhos (Tekirdag/Turkey) (32,33) which is believed to have been used in producing medicines.
Arthemis of Ephesus, Apollon of Didyma, Kybele of Anatolia, Athena of Priene, Apollon of Klaros, Aphrodite of Miletus, Heraion of Samos, Phokaian Athena and Kybele, Athena of Smyrna and many other gods and goddesses of Ionia were the major elements of Paganism in that region.
Ainda que duvidosa essa versao, as coroas, preparadas previamente, eram guardadas no Heraion, o Templo de Hera, indicando que a coroa era ainda a manutencao dos valores de fertilidade e fecundidade que deram origem aos Jogos.
Cuando esta se trasladaba al palacio de Heraion, en la orilla asiatica del Bosforo, sus servidores solian quejarse a causa de la escasez de los bienes mas necesarios.
There are also some ancient settlements in the vicinity of Tekirdag like Barbaros, Misinli, Besiktepe, Bisantre, Perinho, Heraion, and Teichos.
Bassae, Delphi and Perachora are all in breathtaking topographic settings but other temples, such as Dodona, Nemea, Olympia and the Samian Heraion, are in surprisingly prosaic locations.
are particularly numerous in the Gymnasium and the Heraion.
Coming again to the Argive Heraion, where gain and loss, night and day, question and answer, are all flattened.
In the excavation of the Argive Heraion hundreds of miniature hydriai were found, including a dump near the temple that contained 900 miniature hydriai, jars used to carry water, dating from the 7th to the 6th centuries BCE.
One of the finest temples dedicated to her can be found at Heraion on Samos.
The [GREEK TEXT OMITTED], which, as best we can tell, begins and ends with the voice of the poet, develops its information about Sosibius' various athletic victories through a series of direct speeches: a prayer to the Isthmian Poseidon that constitutes the message delivered to Callimachus; celebratory comments by the Nile; and apparently a speech by Sosibius himself which Fuhrer argues may contain a further direct speech by an unknown Argive, who describes a dedication by Sosibius at the Heraion.
Nevertheless, a clear depiction of a buckled belt worn on a bell-corslet is found in the top register of a bronze plate from the Argive Heraion (reproduced in K.