Heraeum

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Heraeum

A temple or sacred enclosure dedicated to the goddess Hera.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abteilung Athen: Samos, Heraion, in Deutschen Archaologischen Institut (ed.
Zur Ernahrung und dera Gebrauch von Pflanzen im Heraion von Samos im 7.
A different type of offering is indicated by the marked over-representation of astragali, mostly unburnt, at the sanctuary of the Kabeiroi near Thebes (Boessneck 1973) and at Zeytin Tepe (Zimmermann 1993), while indirect evidence for some form of offering is provided by unburnt assemblages, with obvious under-representation of thigh and tail bones, from the Heraion at Samos (Boessneck & von den Driesch 1988) and the temple of Athena Alea at Tegea (Vila 2000).
Bassae, Delphi and Perachora are all in breathtaking topographic settings but other temples, such as Dodona, Nemea, Olympia and the Samian Heraion, are in surprisingly prosaic locations.
Three examples were found in the Heraion of Samos among discarded objects.
See Richard Tomlinson, "Water Supplies and Ritual at the Heraion Perachora," in Early Greek Cult Practice: Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposim at the Swedish Institute at Athens, 26-29 June, 1986, ed.
One of the finest temples dedicated to her can be found at Heraion on Samos.
Die Prostyloi (Die romischen Tempel im Heraion von Samos [Vol.
Coming again to the Argive Heraion, where gain and loss, night and day, question and answer, are all flattened.
There are also some ancient settlements in the vicinity of Tekirdag like Barbaros, Misinli, Besiktepe, Bisantre, Perinho, Heraion, and Teichos.
Among the fine offerings from the Classical and Ancient Near-Eastern civilizations include stirrup jars of great King Agamemnon and the Mycenaean's; a Babylon Cuneiform Biscuit - King Nebuchadnezzar II incised in translated Cuneiform; Athenian Red Figure vessels, including An Attic Red Figure Cup by the Heraion Painter ; an Etruscan Terracotta Votive of a Youth, Ex-Christie's , and A Greek Campanian Red-Figure Bell Krater .
Arthemis of Ephesus, Apollon of Didyma, Kybele of Anatolia, Athena of Priene, Apollon of Klaros, Aphrodite of Miletus, Heraion of Samos, Phokaian Athena and Kybele, Athena of Smyrna and many other gods and goddesses of Ionia were the major elements of Paganism in that region.