Hero and Leander


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Hero and Leander

latter drowns, former kills herself in grief. [Gk. Lit.: Hero and Leander; Br. Lit.: Hero and Leander]

Hero and Leander

love affair on the Hellespont tragically ends with latter’s drowning. [Gk. Lit.: Hero and Leander: Br. Lit.: Hero and Leander]
References in periodicals archive ?
Major attraction: JMW Turner's work, The Parting of Hero and Leander
Among their topics are Marlowe thinking globally, whether he was a violent man, the Jew of Malta and the development of city comedy, direct address in the plays of Marlowe and his contemporaries, the eventfulness of Hero and Leander, elegiac aesthetics and the epitaph on Sir Roger Manwood, the Roman destination of Doctor Faustus, and conversion and consumption in Tamburlaine: Part One.
COMING TO TATE: Turner The Parting of Hero and Leander.
The penultimate pair of essays complicates the mold of Marlowe the dramatist by examining Hero and Leander, the first attending to gender and sexuality, the second to gender and voice.
Nonetheless, Grande opens with a chapter on Hero and Leander and (as we shall see) takes her mythic model from Ovid's Elegies, while McAdam includes a discussion of Marlowe's famous epyllion in a brief conclusion.
3) Milorad Pavic, The Inner Side of the Wind, or The Novel of Hero and Leander, trans.
The Hero and Leander theme in Iberian literature, 1500-1800; an anthology of translations.
In readings that seek to dispute the common view of Chapman as a "stolid moralist" and to "tease out the social agenda" (15) in such works as The Shadow of Night (1594), Ovids Banquet of Sence (1595), and Hero and Leander (1598), Huntington situates the poet at the leading edge of an ill-fated but prescient social and aesthetic movement among certain non-aristocratic poets of the 1590s, whose "sensitivity to their own social position begins to generate distinctions that will later evolve into the taste culture which we now inhabit" (vii).
It is The Inner Side of the Wind, or the Novel of Hero and Leander.
JMW TURNER'S The Parting of Hero and Leander will be shown as part of a major new exhibition at Tate Liverpool in 2012.
The papers discuss such topics as erotic bodily contact in the poem Hero and Leander, worship of the goddess Diana as a space for the expression of Renaissance lesbianism, intimacy in the secretarial service that women performed for other women in Renaissance England as a form of political dissent, service and homosociality in the Tudor government as revealed in The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey, the depiction of the prince's erotic life in Shakespeare's Henriad, sexuality and politics in the poems of Katherine Phillips, and homosexual desire in the depiction of Adam and Eve in Milton's Paradise Lost.
Maslen draws on pedagogical institutions, rhetorical tracts, and translations to sketch out ways in which the Metamorphoses was available to political interpretation in the sixteenth century; John Roe takes a complementary approach to two erotic poems, Hero and Leander and Venus and Adonis.