Herod Antipas


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Herod Antipas: Herod the Great

Herod Antipas

died ?40 ad, tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea (4 bc--40 ad); son of Herod the Great. At the instigation of his wife Herodias, he ordered the execution of John the Baptist

Herod Antipas

presents John the Baptist’s head to Salome. [N.T.: Mark 6:17–28]
References in periodicals archive ?
Herodias, then, was related to Herod Antipas not just by marriage (affinity) but also by blood (consanguinity).
When therefore Salome had danced before Herod Antipas, and after he had promised to grant her a wish even to relegating to her half of his kingdom, the girl, at her mother's insistence, demanded the head of John the Baptist (Mk 6:28-29).
This reflection is usually understood as meaning: Herod Antipas ("that fox") cannot stop me from pursuing my profession ("practicing healing"), and I shall continue to do so in the days to come--not taking the expression "the third day" literally.
In fact, only a very small group of supporters of the High Priest, himself appointed by the Roman procurator, and Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee, whose allegiance to Judaism was questionable, must have held a meeting on the eve of Passover, against all the rules of Pharisaic teachings, to condemn Jesus and hand him over to Pontius Pilate, so that he might proceed with the death penalty.
His son Herod Antipas was tetrarch of the Roman provinces of Galilee and Peraea from A.
However, it was Herod Antipas who engaged in the most egregious redistribution that favored the elite members of the temple priesthood:
Although no script has survived, records of payments by the Smiths' company make clear that its pageant of the Passion was as dominated by Herod Antipas as the Shearmen and Taylors' pageant was by Herod the Great.
Unfortunately, the Shearmen and Taylors' records of payment have not survived, so it is impossible to know with certainty whether their Herod the Great was as spectacular as the Smiths' Herod Antipas.
John was imprisoned for criticising the government, in the person of Herod Antipas.
And the outcome of such an approach to life is that others are brought together, even despite themselves, as with Pilate and Herod Antipas (23:12).
Pilate endured by making key pacts with Herod Antipas, the Roman-appointed king of the Jews, and the household of high priests, run by Annas and his son-in-law Caiaphas.
Of course, this Herod is Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great.