Chivalric Romance

(redirected from Heroic romance)

Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
Rowling) only the chapter on Walter Wangerin's The Tale of the Dun Cow shows the authors consistently applying the principles they reveal in part one and trying to place the work on their continuum of myth, heroic romance, and fairy tale.
Foreshadowed by the success of 1 Tamburlaine, the heroic romance became a staple of the Admiral's Men's repertory.
Other heroic romances, such as Mahomet and Godfrey of Boulogne, together with various kinds of history plays--Antony and Vallia, Constantine, Harry of Cornwall, and Zenobia--remained favorites of the Admiral's Men and provided natural roles for Alleyn.
Meanwhile, the emerging novel challenged the very concept of genre in its heterodox appetite for virtually every other kind: "conduct books, sentimental and rakish comedy, 'she' tragedy, pastoral and heroic romance, ballads, newspapers, letters, diaries, paintings by Hogarth, essays by Steele" (2).
Bennett provides a valuable addition to the Cavendish play texts by making the comedy The Sociable Companions; Or The Female Wits available in a modern edition for the first time, pairing it with the heroic romance Bell in Campo.
But he also discusses attempts to mythologize the war and relate it to heroic romance, as David Jones did.
But the Bastard, following Elinor's counsel, chooses an opportunity for heroic romance over inherited lands.
Grande justifies her separation of these levels by observing that "each play emphasizes a different aspect of dilation": Tamburlaine, the generic aspect, by "setting the conventions of heroic romance against those of de casibus tragedy"; Dido and Dr.
Like Patterson and Smith, he distinguishes between English political/allegorical romance, which focuses on adventure, and French heroic romance, which focuses on love and reflection; while admitting that elements of the latter make their way into the former, he tends to see the passion of love as playing a minor, mostly decorative role in English romances (159, 192).