Herophilus

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Herophilus

(hĭrŏf`ələs), fl. 300 B.C., Greek anatomist, called by some the father of scientific anatomy. A contemporary of Erasistratus at Alexandria, he made public dissections, comparing human and animal morphology. He studied the structure of the brain (which he regarded as the site of intelligence) and the spinal cord and distinguished between motor and sensory nerves. He also investigated the eye, the alimentary canal (he is credited with naming the duodenum), the reproductive organs, and the arteries and veins.

Herophilus

died ?280 bc, Greek anatomist in Alexandria. He was the first to distinguish sensory from motor nerves
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the ancient library of Alexandria in which they were kept--the library infamously set aflame, ostensibly by accident, during Caesar's conquest of the city in 48 BC--scant evidence of the works of Herophilos remain.
Then follows a detailed refutation of the argument of sameness: women do not have the small vessels which Herophilos has first observed and named; [20] it is absurd to consider the neck of the uterus a reverse of the male member, for the former is but a cavity while the latter has muscles, nerves, and vessels for urine and semen.
In the first, he surveys the history of anatomy, in order to show that Renaissance anatomists not only did not reject the authority of the Greeks, but that each of three major sixteenth-century Italian writers in the field aimed literally to revive the investigative program of a different Greek predecessor or predecessors: Galen, in the case of Vesalius; Herophilos and Erasistratos, in the case of Realdo Colombo; and Aristotle, in the case of Girolamo Fabrizi.