Herophilus

(redirected from Herophilos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

Herophilus

(hĭrŏf`ələs), fl. 300 B.C., Greek anatomist, called by some the father of scientific anatomy. A contemporary of Erasistratus at Alexandria, he made public dissections, comparing human and animal morphology. He studied the structure of the brain (which he regarded as the site of intelligence) and the spinal cord and distinguished between motor and sensory nerves. He also investigated the eye, the alimentary canal (he is credited with naming the duodenum), the reproductive organs, and the arteries and veins.

Herophilus

died ?280 bc, Greek anatomist in Alexandria. He was the first to distinguish sensory from motor nerves
References in periodicals archive ?
The works of Herophilos, father of the anatomy, have vanished; so too has vanished the ancient library of Alexandria itself, archetype of libraries; thus do the products of human labor fade into the recesses of history, reduced to the stuff of legend, kept alive as much by accident, as by any concerted effort; remembered only through happenstance, unexpectedly rediscovered by investigators out to prove or disprove the facts found in some fraudulent letter, some pseudepigraphum or another, concocted as primitive publicity stunt for a new edition of this or that book, some Letter of Aristeas, a Bible- saleman's best effort at falsifying the provenance of his latest product.
As von Staden points out, Herophilos identified and named the epididymis, a duct system over or "near" the testicles (testicle=didymos).
673b29; also Herophilos on the liver [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] .