Hertfordshire

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Hertfordshire

(här`fərdshĭr, härt`–), county (1991 pop. 951,500), 631 sq mi (1,634 sq km), E central England. The county seat is HertfordHertford,
town (1991 pop. 21,350), E central England, on the Lea River. Hertford is an agricultural market with light industries, including brewing, flour milling, and the manufacture of leather goods and stationery.
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, but WatfordWatford,
borough and district (1991 pop. 109,503), Hertfordshire, SE England. Watford is mainly residential with many kinds of shops. The city is renowned for its publishing and produces many of England's periodicals.
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, Hemel HempsteadHemel Hempstead
, town (1991 pop. 80,110), Hertfordshire, SE England. Hemel Hempstead was designated one of the new towns in 1946 to alleviate overpopulation in London. It is a market town and London suburb.
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, StevenageStevenage,
city (1991 pop. 74,757) and district, Hertfordshire, E central England. Stevenage was the first new town to be designated under the New Towns Act of 1946, a program to decentralize population and industry.
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, and St. AlbansSaint Albans
, city and district (1991 pop. 76,709), Hertfordshire, E central England. The market city of Saint Albans has printing, engineering, and clothing industries. Many of its residents work in London.
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 are more important urban centers. Administratively, the county is divided into the districts of Three Rivers, Watford, Hertsmere, Welwyn Hatfield, Broxbourne, East Hertfordshire, Stevenage, North Hertfordshire, St. Albans, and Dacorum. The county contains four of the eight new townsnew towns,
planned urban communities in Great Britain, developed by long-term loans from the central government and first authorized by the New Towns Act of 1946. The chief purpose of the act was to reduce congestion in the great cities (or at least prevent its increase) through
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 planned around London since 1947: HatfieldHatfield,
town (1991 pop. 33,174), Hertfordshire, SE England. Hatfield was designated one of the new towns in 1948 to alleviate overpopulation in London. The plans for this new town were coordinated with those of nearby Welwyn Garden City.
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, Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, and Welwyn Garden CityWelwyn Garden City
, town (1991 pop. 40,665), Hertfordshire, E central England. It is a garden city, founded by Ebenezer Howard in 1920, as well as one of the new towns. Its industries produce a variety of products, including radio and television sets.
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.

The terrain is level except for an extension of the Chiltern Hills in the northwest. The chief streams are the Colne, the Lea, and the Stort, which drain into the Thames. Although one of London's "Home Counties," Hertfordshire is primarily an agricultural region, producing large quantities of wheat and hay as well as dairy products, vegetables, and flowers for the nearby London market. There are diverse industries, such as brickmaking, printing, brewing (especially in Watford), papermaking, and engineering. The county figured prominently in the military history of England, particularly during the Wars of the Roses (see Roses, Wars of theRoses, Wars of the,
traditional name given to the intermittent struggle (1455–85) for the throne of England between the noble houses of York (whose badge was a white rose) and Lancaster (later associated with the red rose).

About the middle of the 15th cent.
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).

Hertfordshire

a county of S England, bordering on Greater London in the south: mainly low-lying, with the Chiltern Hills in the northwest; largely agricultural; expanding light industries, esp in the new towns. Administrative centre: Hertford. Pop.: 1 040 900 (2003 est.). Area: 1634 sq. km (631 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Collins has now been retired for 15-years but has kept in good shape working at his farm in Hertfordshire, England.
Patrick's meeting with Glyn Stacey, director of the UK Stem Cell Bank at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control in Hertfordshire, England.
This oversized title (8 1/4 x 11 3/4") collects the findings of twenty-seven contributors who completed archaeological investigations between 2003-2005 along the 6km route of the A505 Baldock bypass in Hertfordshire, England.
London, July 24 (ANI): Police officials in Hertfordshire, England, are reportedly taking crime-prevention tips from 12 prolific burglars in return for not being jailed.
Wood of the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Hertfordshire, England.
HERTFORDSHIRE, ENGLAND - Richard Harris shuffles through the 15th-century palace where a day's worth of press promoting ``Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone'' is transpiring, off for his second cigarette break in as many interviews.
Dixons Group plc, a consumer electronics retailer based in Hertfordshire, England, expects to spend $33.
Stott, who works at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control in Hertfordshire, England, wrote a brief letter to the editor of NATURE that astonished AIDS researchers worldwide.
Dave Williams and Louise Odin, of the School of Psychology and Sports Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, England, provide "a first and small step in an area popularly associated with risk, yet significantly under-researched.
Asterand operates laboratories in Detroit, Michigan, USA and in Royston, Hertfordshire, England.
HERTFORDSHIRE, England - Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint are here to take their victory lap.
in Hertfordshire, England, who helped identify and test the drug.

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