Hesperides


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Hesperides

(hĕspĕr`ĭdēz), in Greek mythology, daughters of Atlas. They lived in a fabulous garden located at the western extremity of the world. There they guarded (with the aid of the dragon Ladon) a tree that bore golden apples. Hercules killed the dragon and obtained the apples as one of his 12 labors.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his monologue, Caponsacchi, the canon who rescues Pompilia, also compares to her to the apples of the Hesperides.
We may conclude then that, by considering Turner's Garden of the Hesperides as a clue to the spiritual status of his epoch, Ruskin offers an indication of the manner of his comments as a social critic.
The Dragon appears in Turner's painting The Goddess of Discord Choosing the Apple of Contention in the Garden of the Hesperides (1806).
The Hesperides towed the torpedo-shaped continuous plankton recorder at a depth of around 10 metres below the surface.
Atlas (Grandad) on the other hand, is easily identifiable, especially when met in company with the Hesperides (his "other family"), and the signs of the Zodiac are even more so.
The pebble contains Mirual Algae to moisturise, Hawaiian Micro-Algae to tone, Nymphea alba to soothe and Hesperides Essential Oil to help you unwind and relax.
And they reached the end of the world, in our case the Pillars of Hercules, the golden apples of the Hesperides, opening up new horizons and putting in train processes which, in Greece and Phoenicia as well as in the West, led, in different ways, to fundamentally new endeavours.
In much the same way, Robert Herrick (1648) placed "The argument of his book" as the first poem in Hesperides, and Robert Frost (1971) insisted on "The pasture" at the forefront of his poems.
Brimley Johnson's "Red Letter Library" (1911; item 44); George Herbert, from the Canterbury Poet series (1885; item 49); and Robert Herrick with Pollard's Muses' Library edition of The Hesperides and Nobel Number [1905] (item 50).
It is the story in which Atlas devices a scheme to make Heracles hold up the world temporarily while he fetches the apples of the Hesperides.
Gloria Betcher applies the Devon volume to Robert Herrick's Hesperides to interrogate the interplay of autobiography and poetic invention in the poems inspired by Dean Prior.
The term Hesperidean, however, taken from the lovely Garden of the Hesperides in Classical myth, refers to a paradise that is thought to exist now; though the route may be difficult, or the exact location lost, it is nevertheless thought to be potentially accessible and worth striving for.