Hidatsa


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Hidatsa

(hēdät`sä), Native North Americans, also known as the Minitari and the Gros Ventre. Their language belongs to the Siouan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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). After their separation from the CrowCrow,
indigenous people of North America whose language belongs to the Siouan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languages) and who call themselves the Absaroka, or bird people.
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, with whom they were united before the historic period, they occupied several agricultural villages on the upper Missouri River in North Dakota and were in close alliance with the occupants of other villages, the ArikaraArikara
, Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Caddoan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). Archaeological evidence shows that they occupied the banks of the upper Missouri River since at least the 14th cent.
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 and the MandanMandan
, indigenous people of North America whose language belongs to the Siouan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). The Mandan were a sedentary tribe of the Plains area and were culturally connected with their neighbors on the Missouri
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. The Hidatsa villages, with circular earth lodges, were enclosed by an earthen wall. Among other Hidatsa traits were the cultivation of corn and an annual organized buffalo hunt. They had a complex social organization and elaborate ceremonies, including the sun dance. After the smallpox epidemic of 1837, they moved up the Missouri and established themselves close to the trading post of Fort Berthold. Together with the Arikara and Mandan, many Hidatsa reside on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. There were some 1,500 Hidatsa in the United States in 1990.

Bibliography

See A. W. Bowers, Hidatsa Social and Ceremonial Organization (1965).

References in periodicals archive ?
The site contains a visitor center and a full-scale Hidatsa earthlodge.
The Arikara are one of the Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara), headquartered at New Town, North Dakota.
Hall ("Red Tipped Arrow"), president of The National Congress of American Indians and chairman of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation and Jim Gray, chairman of the Inter-Tribal Monitoring Association, and principal chief of the Osage Nation along with Elouise Cobell, formed and led a national working group comprised of national native leaders, organizations, and individuals who collectively drafted the Principles.
Thanks to Fred Olsen and his camera lens, we are provided with a vivid glimpse of the world of the Three Affiliated Tribes-Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara--at a time of acute cultural transition and social change.
The panel will include Tex Hall, chairman of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, served as president of the National Congress of American Indians; Charles Royer, national program director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Urban Health initiative, a former mayor of Seattle, and journalist; and, others.
The current issue features a number of stunning portraits of individuals and family groups which, thanks to the photographer and his lens, provide us with a vivid glimpse of early twentieth century life amongst the Three Affiliated Tribes; the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara.
Cavalier and Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nation (MHA) were chosen from the State of North Dakota.
In 1845, the Like-a-Fishhook village of earth-covered lodges and log cabins was established by Mandan and Hidatsa survivors and, shortly afterwards, in 1862, their numbers were further swelled by the Arikara.
A famous drawing executed by Edward Goodbird in 1914 (Gilmore and Schneider 1987) depicts an early Hidatsa Grass Dancer wearing a pair of these quilled knee bands (Figure 1).
The Three Affiliated Tribes are comprised of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Tribes with tribal headquarters in New Town, North Dakota.
Gilbert Wilson's Hidatsa informants told him that otter or mountain lion fur bow case-quivers were considerd very valuable and used only on dress occasions, although one informant said that it was a mark of courage to wear such a quiver in battle (Holm, 1981:61).
The Arikara population was about the same or larger than the Mandan and Hidatsa together, and it seems that the Arikara maintained a separate identity to a greater extent than the former two tribes.