Hieroglyph


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hieroglyph

[′hī·rə‚glif]
(geology)
Any sort of sedimentary mark or structure occurring on a bedding plane.

Hieroglyph

A figure representing an idea and intended message; a word or root of a word; a sound that is part of a word, especially applied to the engraved marks and symbols found on the monuments of ancient Egypt.

hieroglyph

A figure representing (a) an idea, and intended to convey a meaning, (b) a word or root of a word, or (c) a sound which is part of a word; esp. applied to the engraved marks and symbols found on the monuments of ancient Egypt.
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of this project, Frank Kammerzell, Henrike Simon, and Maria Isabel Toro Rueda compiled a computerized database of all the hieroglyphs, totaling more than 285,000, found in the texts of the pyramids of Unas, Teti, Pepi I, Merenre, Pepi II, and Neith.
On attitudes toward the hieroglyphs between the early seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries, see Hornung 98-140.
HIER WE GO: Hieroglyph completes a Musselburgh double for Fairley and boss Johnston
In defining hieroglyphs and other terms, Albright also assumes a clean slate of musical understanding, as if gestures in music have a universal meaning not limited by culture, geography, or historical moment.
In the control room, there are a half dozen guitars, including one fashioned like the hieroglyph.
If, as a child, you learned to write out your name in hieroglyphs, you learned only a few of the hundreds of hieroglyphs available to the ancient Egyptians.
As Steve McLean, curator of the Hancock Museum, explains: "While the pyramids, temples, mummies, hieroglyphs and Tutankhamen's treasure tell us a lot about ancient Egypt they only provide part of the picture.
A great starting point for hieroglyphs is the educational site on ancient Egyptian writing at the British Museum in London.
He is often shown with his finger in his mouth, a gesture that in Egypt represented the hieroglyph for his name, but was misinterpreted by the Greeks and Romans, resulting in his adoption as the god of silence and secrecy.
In some places the reduction of the size of the hieroglyph may hide its detail, so it has been decided to allow the hieroglyph to be seen, but to move it from its actual position in the writing of a word and sentence.
The second main part, "On the Origin of the Decorative System in the Sixteenth Century: The Grotesque," addresses, in separate subsections, the nature of the grotesque and its transferability to the system of the Sistine ceiling, the "Irreale" in the sources, and the relationship between the grotesque and the hieroglyph.
In the nineteenth century, a French team of scientists and artists recorded every hieroglyph they encountered even though no one could understand them