Hieronimo

Hieronimo

Spanish general goes mad on seeing the body of his murdered son. [Br. Drama: The Spanish Tragedy in Magill II, 990]
See: Madness

Hieronimo

stages a play that gives him the opportunity to kill his son’s murderers. [Br. Drama: The Spanish Tragedy in Magill II, 990]
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She shows that The First Part of Hieronimo (published in a quarto of 1605) was written long after Kyd's death, though she does not test Lukas Erne's theory that remnants of a Kyd play dominate some scenes.
For Kyd's Hieronimo and Shakespeare's Hamlet, the pursuit of vengeance is also a confrontation with original sin and hence with their own implication in the crimes they would redress; for Middleton's Vindice, the unavailability of "confessional exculpation" transforms his own "self-disclosures" into compulsive and sadistic "delight" (8991).
From Hieronimo to Brutus and beyond, the way in which reflexive forms create a rhetorical, personal force permits a range of responses to hardship, especially political hardship.
3, (26) however, Hieronimo enters and "knocks vp the curtaine" (K2v).
This archaic material is also, he argues, "expressive of primal emotions and extreme stress" (174), and they constitute "fragmented allegories" because they "evoke feeling and atmosphere" in such a way that it aligns Hamlet momentarily with Hieronimo and Marlowe's Barabas (174-75).
In addition, within the same context of loss of the Ur-tongue of the human race, Eliot alludes to the sixteenth-century Elizabethan tragedy, The Spanish Tragedy in which a Spanish knight Hieronimo bites off his own tongue after having avenged his son's murderers.
Although he admits such topoi may be tiresome to many ("oro, perlas y corales, pareciendoles que seria la estatua de Nabucodonosor" [585]), he cannot refrain from listing the many examples from antique as well as Renaissance poets: Cornelio Galla, Virgil, Fausto Sabeo, Mantuano, Arias Montano, Hieronimo Vidas, Poliziano, Horace, Pontano, Boethius, Statius, Garcilaso.
In the tragedy, the revenger-playwright Hieronimo, who we indeed last hear of being led in triumph by the ghost of Andrea to "where Orpheus plaies," thus becomes in Hutson's reading--as judge, jury, and executioner, as well as dramatist--expressive of a union of popular and poetic modes of justice.
The first chapter, on Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy and Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and Hamlet, claims that the plays endorse the efficacy of traditional, extensive mourning ritual: Hieronimo and Isabella, the protagonists of The Spanish Tragedy, preserve in their flamboyant demands for and attempts at revenge the "passionate remembrance" associated with Catholic ritual (38); Titus Andronicus's antagonists, Tamora and Aaron, represent a Protestant rigorism opposed by Titus in his commitment to elaborate funeral rites; and Hamlet maintains an ideal of "maximized mourning" that governs not only his sartorial choices but also his revenge efforts.
In sua vece, uscivano due ulteriori contributi con la trascrizione, tratta dal codice marciano, delle novelle di Julia e Pruneo e di Hieronimo e Lucretia.
The paper shows how famous male revengers such as Kyd's Hieronimo and Shakespeare's Hamlet are characterised in a way that subtly resists their firm categorisation either as righteous or truly immoral figures.
During a sojourn in Madrid to perform Cassio in Verdi's Otello, Nfipoles encounters Hieronimo Manur, a wealthy Belgian banker, and his restless wife, Natalia.