Hieronimo

Hieronimo

Spanish general goes mad on seeing the body of his murdered son. [Br. Drama: The Spanish Tragedy in Magill II, 990]
See: Madness

Hieronimo

stages a play that gives him the opportunity to kill his son’s murderers. [Br. Drama: The Spanish Tragedy in Magill II, 990]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
7) In 1 Hieronimo (1604) an assassin kills Alcario by mistake, and he dies with 'Oh, oh, oh
Spectacles of violent excess characterize revenge plays; most emblematic of these spectacles, perhaps, is the scene of Hieronimo pulling back the curtain to reveal Horatio's body in the fourth act of The Spanish Tragedy: "See here my show, look on this spectacle," he demands as he reveals his son's corpse (Kyd 1989, 4.
The Spanish court, at least initially, focuses on a dispute needing to be adjudicated and, later, on a quest for justice that begins with the Knight Marshal Hieronimo seeking the identity of his son's killers, carefully gathering evidence, and looking to the king, then the heavens, for redress.
18) Achillini (1466-1538) crafted a long poem in octaves titled Il Viridario de Giovanne Philotheo Achillino Bolognese, Impresso in Bologna per Hieronimo di Plato Bolognese nel 1513, containing twelve elegies.
For a selection of other dumb shows that use this formula see Captain Thomas Stukeley, Kir; 1 Hieronimo, A2r; Warning for Fair Women, E3v; Antonio's Revenge, I2r; Devil's Charter, A2r; Birth of Merlin, C3r, G4r; Pericles, Civ, G3r; Golden Age, C4r; Four Plays in One, 8E2r, 8E2v; Queen of Corinth, 6C1v; Herod and Antipater, I4v; Maidenhead Well Lost, F4v; Queen and Concubine, C3v; Bloody Banquet, A2r; Fatal Contract, E3v.
Estas criticas son similares a las que en 1477 hizo Hieronimo Squarciafico contra la imprenta, cuando argumento que la "abundancia de libros hace menos estudiosos a los hombres" porque destruye la memoria y debilita el pensamiento.
She shows that The First Part of Hieronimo (published in a quarto of 1605) was written long after Kyd's death, though she does not test Lukas Erne's theory that remnants of a Kyd play dominate some scenes.
For Kyd's Hieronimo and Shakespeare's Hamlet, the pursuit of vengeance is also a confrontation with original sin and hence with their own implication in the crimes they would redress; for Middleton's Vindice, the unavailability of "confessional exculpation" transforms his own "self-disclosures" into compulsive and sadistic "delight" (8991).
He thinks scorn to do as he's done to, but if I were as you, I'd cry: go by, Hieronimo, go by
The reason for these borrowings was mainly narrative: if we follow his Notes to The Waste Land, we realize that he was not borrowing words, but stories, such as the myth of the nightingale, Shakespeare's story in The Tempest, Dante's Inferno, Thomas Kyd's incidents in The Spanish Tragedy (or Hieronimo is Mad Again), etc.
3, (26) however, Hieronimo enters and "knocks vp the curtaine" (K2v).
Like Hieronimo in The Spanish Tragedy, King Lear is mad again.