HFCs

(redirected from High-fructose corn syrup)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

HFCs:

see chlorofluorocarbonschlorofluorocarbons
(CFCs), organic compounds that contain carbon, chlorine, and fluorine atoms. CFCs are highly effective refrigerants that were developed in response to the pressing need to eliminate toxic and flammable substances, such as sulfur dioxide and ammonia, in
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
50 a liter for beverages using caloric and noncaloric sweeteners, and imposed a tax of P9 a liter for beverages using high-fructose corn syrup.
We know that they don't feel good about high-fructose corn syrup so we're giving them what they're looking for instead," she said.
Researchers fed 85 adults aged 18 to 40 beverages sweetened with enough high-fructose corn syrup to supply 0,10,1 7.
Lopez pointed out that, indeed, high-fructose corn syrup is loaded with fructose sugars and, therefore, can raise blood sugar levels.
I think it's a stretch to say the study shows high-fructose corn syrup has anything special to do with diabetes," New York University nutrition professor Marion Nestle (http://www.
High-fructose corn syrup is 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose.
The substitution of high-fructose corn syrup for cane sugar is a pattern that became common in the food industry in the decades that followed Hitchcock's landmark film.
The sugar, which is found predominantly in fruit, honey and high-fructose corn syrup, tickles taste cells found on the pancreas.
In one corner stands the corn lobby, desperate to repackage high-fructose corn syrup (or HFCS) after having been stung by persistent criticisms that the product is fueling America's obesity epidemic.
The sweet sector of the food and beverage industry soured in late April when three sugar producers filed a false-advertising lawsuit against several high-fructose corn syrup manufacturers--including Archer Daniels Midland Co.
Johns Hopkins Medicine reports that researchers have shown that bees fed high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) do not activate the same genes as bees fed honey.
Though fructose, a simple sugar, is naturally found in high levels in fruit, it is also added to many processed foods as the sweetener called high-fructose corn syrup, or HFCS.

Full browser ?