high-temperature superconductor

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high-temperature superconductor

[′hī ′tem·prə·chər ′sü·pər·kən‚dək·tər]
(solid-state physics)
A ceramic material, consisting of an oxide of a rare-earth element, barium, and copper, which displays superconductivity at temperatures of 90 K (-298°F) or more.
References in periodicals archive ?
We decided to take a look at the other compounds that had not yet been studied this way, where people had not yet found these kinds of effects," Comin says, pointing to a number of cuprates, the copper and oxygen compounds that have been among the leading contenders for high-temperature superconductivity.
The aim of this project is to overcome the electron-phonon/electronic dualism in the "glue", and prove that the key to high-temperature superconductivity is the anomaly of the normal state.
He said that this unexpected discovery brings together both orbital fluctuation theory and the 50-year-old 'excitonic' theory for high-temperature superconductivity, opening a new frontier for condensed matter physics.
The new measurements help to clarify the fundamental characteristics of this exotic system, which is thought to be closely related to the origins of high-temperature superconductivity.
The volume, based on the July 2009 workshop, collects international research on the design, analysis, materials, and optimization of high-temperature superconductivity and electromagnetic manufacturing.
The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity is currently being applied and tested in several scenarios, but we are still years away from broader adoption:
Scientists have been trying to figure out how high-temperature superconductivity works since copper oxides, or cuprates, were found to exhibit resistance-free flow in 1986.
In one experiment, he and his group proved that high-temperature superconductivity does not hinge on a magical glue binding electrons together.
Researchers working in physics, from the US, Europe, Brazil, Mexico, and Japan discuss Cooper pairs, superconductivity in highly correlated systems, the behavior of the Bose Einstein condensation critical temperature, the plasmon exchange model in carbon nanotubes, thermodynamic properties of point node superconductors, theory of the thermopower in YBCO, high-temperature superconductivity in carbon nanotubes, and magnetism and quark matter.
However, the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity is still poorly understood.
Those days of frustration may be coming to an end after a recent publication in Science by members of an international consortium that went looking for the underlying mechanism responsible for high-temperature superconductivity.
The group has deep experience in electrical engineering and computer science-related fields, and in other areas, including Internet search, high-temperature superconductivity, mobile telecommunications, digital video and audio, and biotechnology.

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