high

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high

1. Music (of sound) acute in pitch; having a high frequency
2. Geography (of latitudes) situated relatively far north or south from the equator
3. Informal being in a state of altered consciousness, characterized esp by euphoria and often induced by the use of alcohol, narcotics, etc.
4. (of a gear) providing a relatively great forward speed for a given engine speed
5. of or relating to the High Church
6. Cards
a. having a relatively great value in a suit
b. able to win a trick
7. Informal a state of altered consciousness, often induced by alcohol, narcotics, etc.
8. another word for anticyclone
9. short for high school
10. (esp in Oxford) the High Street
11. Electronics the voltage level in a logic circuit corresponding to logical one

What does it mean when you dream about a high place?

Dreaming about being elevated can reflect, on the one hand, a sense of broad scope, of standing above and observing other things. On the other hand, it can indicate a sense of detachment, of not really being involved. Dreaming about seeing something elevated can indicate being impressed or being challenged.

high

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(meteorology)
An area of high pressure, referring to a maximum of atmospheric pressure in two dimensions (closed isobars) in the synoptic surface chart, or a maximum of height (closed contours) in the constant-pressure chart; since a high is, on the synoptic chart, always associated with anticyclonic circulation, the term is used interchangeably with anticyclone.

high

high
i. A height between 25,000 and 50,000 ft (7.5–15 km).
ii. An area of high barometric pressure with its attendant system of anticyclonic winds. They circulate clock-wise in the Northern Hemisphere and anticlock-wise in the Southern Hemisphere.
References in classic literature ?
I like it, because the people seem to have acted with thoughtfulness and dignity; and this proud gentleman, one of his Majesty's high officers, was made to feel that King George could not protect him in doing wrong.
They accord with the nature of such scenery, and add much to its romantic effect; bounding like goats from crag to crag, often trooping along the lofty shelves of the mountains, under the guidance of some venerable patriarch with horns twisted lower than his muzzle, and sometimes peering over the edge of a precipice, so high that they appear scarce bigger than crows; indeed, it seems a pleasure to them to seek the most rugged and frightful situations, doubtless from a feeling of security.
Thus, in the midst of the mud and at the heart of the fog, sits the Lord High Chancellor in his High Court of Chancery.
About a mile and a half from Shechem we halted at the base of Mount Ebal before a little square area, inclosed by a high stone wall, neatly whitewashed.
As the bearers, among whom was Anna Mikhaylovna, passed the young man he caught a momentary glimpse between their heads and backs of the dying man's high, stout, uncovered chest and powerful shoulders, raised by those who were holding him under the armpits, and of his gray, curly, leonine head.
Burning with white-hot anger was the High Priestess, her heart a seething, molten mass of hatred for Tarzan of the Apes.
It seemed ages to the ape-man before her arm ceased its upward progress and the knife halted high above his unprotected breast.
This was no more than a whim, however, prompted by pride in such exclusiveness of diet only possible to one in such high place.
Madam," said the Superb High Chairman, "we have no objection to visitors if they will pledge themselves not to publish anything they hear.
High is the grove of their masts, as they nod by turns on the rolling wave.
And laughter-loving Aphrodite put on all her rich clothes, and when she had decked herself with gold, she left sweet-smelling Cyprus and went in haste towards Troy, swiftly travelling high up among the clouds.
So long before being forwarded to Tampa Town, the iron ore, molten in the great furnaces of Coldspring, and brought into contact with coal and silicium heated to a high temperature, was carburized and transformed into cast iron.