hijacking

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hijacking

Seizing unauthorized control of a computer or communications session in order to steal data or compromise the system in some manner. Following are various hijacking terms in this encyclopedia. See hack.

HIJACKING TERMS Bluejacking clickjacking DNS hijacking modem hijacking page hijacking piggybacking phone phreaking proxy hijacking replay attack URL hijacking
References in periodicals archive ?
Brigadier General Ramezan Sharif of the Pasdaran's public affairs office later announced that the hijacking was planned by Israel in an effort to distract from the visit to Tehran that day of Lebanese President Saad Hariri.
The plot, he said, eventually evolved into hijacking a small number of planes in the United States and East Asia and either having them explode or crash into targets simultaneously.
This was the context in which the Cuban government ended the hijackings by executing the three hijackers of the Havana harbor ferry.
The two aircraft were reportedly packed with military personnel pretending to be civilians taking part in a hijacking attempt.
As if the recent hijacking of a competitor's flight wasn't bad enough news for business, the kidnapping of a Colombian senator on board the plane prompted Pastrana to abandon peace talks with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and to order the military to retake a large rebel-controlled zone in southern Colombia.
The man apparently tried to overtake the driver after ranting about hijackings.
The call came in the wake of the kamikaze hijackings which ended in the terror attacks on the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon which have left almost 7,000 dead and missing.
Historically, most aircraft hijackings were used as a means of extortion.
The Hakodate District Court gave him eight years in prison in March 1997 saying the hijacking was not particularly vicious compared with other hijackings.
Car thefts and armed hijackings are common in South Africa, particularly in Johannesburg.
This is roughly the moment between the first hijackings to Havana in the late '50s and the 1988 downing of Pan Am flight 103.
Stansted Airport, Essex - earmarked for hijackings into the London area - was put on alert.