Hildegard of Bingen

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Hildegard of Bingen

Saint. 1098--1179, German abbess, poet, composer, and mystic
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Others consider music's role in state formation in Italy and Portugal; 78 rpm recordings as a mode of dissemination of jazz; electronic technologies in the music of Kaija Saariaho and the Beatles; and how cultural, political, and technological factors affected recent musical scholarship on early music, 16th-century music, and the contemporary marketing of Hildegard von Bingen.
It is also true that Hildegard von Bingen also had a very close male companion who supported her and gave her great comfort.
JUTTA KOETHER, artist: Oh there was a musical turn that messed with my painting and my perspective NY Rave (Disco 2000 at Limelight), Blumfeld Hildegard von Bingen, Tom Verlaine's "Soul Freedom 2000" (live at Tramps in '96) Tilt by Scott Walker, Gummo (soundtrack), my "Diadal" experience Millie Jackson's Totally Unrestricted
40) The question of Hermas's Shepherd is raised both in the preface, addressed to Adelheid von Ottenstein (abbess of the Benedictine convent of Rupertsberg near Bingen, founded by Hildegard von Bingen in 1147) and in the postface addressed to Markwest von Hatstein, Kilian Westhausen and Wolfgang von Matt.
Accompanied by harpist William Taylor (here playing a traditional wire-strung clairseach), the group invests this music with a passionate immediacy that brings to mind some of the exemplary interpretations of Hildegard von Bingen recorded by Sequentia in the 1980s.
Music by Hildegard von Bingen frames readings by Patience Tomlinson of readings from the herbal book written by the prolific nun as well as from Carmina Burana, a collection of rather more earthy poems made by Hildegard's roistering contemporary monks (7.
Rhindotrene focuses on Hildegard von Bingen (10981179), a charismatic abbess well known for her very detailed visions and mystical powers.
Women like Hildegard von Bingen, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Siena and Teresa of Avila became known for their spiritual guidance, their intelligence, their shrewd financial management and their artistic creations, not their childbearing capabilities.
Two orchestras chose Rainbow Body by the American Christopher Theofanidis, a flaccid, anodyne homage to Hildegard von Bingen often bizarrely sounding like a Celtic raga, with an ending dripping with tintinnabulatory ecstasy.
The early music essays describe methods for encoding fifteenth- and sixteenth-century mensural notation and the music of Hildegard von Bingen.
Instead you need to look back to medieval mystics such as Hildegard von Bingen, or Eastern European Peasants to find any kinship.
Hildegard von Bingen, surprisingly, is even treated as a popular composer, her music much used as source material for synthesizer composers with New Age ambitions.