Himera


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Himera

(hĭm`ərə), ancient city on the north coast of Sicily, founded by Greeks in the 7th cent. B.C. Here in 480 B.C. (a traditional date) forces led by Gelon routed the Carthaginians led by Hamilcar. Years later the Carthaginians destroyed (409 B.C.) the city. The citizens moved to nearby Thermae (modern Termini). The poet Stesichorus was born in Himera.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: Custody services pro-advertising with a co-marketing agreement between the tourist district and cefalu parks madonie and himera and aggiudicatrio (under the call afferent fesrn2007 the po / 2013 operational objective 3.
Stesichoros was from the city of Himera in Sicily, and probably flourished during the late seventh and early sixth centuries BCE.
The regions considered in depth are Himera and its hinterland in Sicily, the emporia and native settlements of Catalonia, Marseille and its surroundings, Velia and neighbouring sites in Campania, a wider zone of interaction in Thrace, the Aegean and the Black Sea (with a good overview of Thrace by Zosia Archibald) and finally the area north of the Black Sea.
Persians were defeated at Marathon (490 BC), Salamis (480 BC), Eurymedon (468 BC) and their allies from Carthage at Himera (480 BC).
a way to warn the people of Himera not to give Phalaris, who they had
Another outing to Castelbuono gave us the chance to see an outstanding Norman Castle, though a litle further away we could not for the life of us find the ruined Greek temple at Himera, built after the defeat of the Carthiginians.
A car drive to Castelbuono gave us the chance to see an outstanding Norman Castle, though a litle further away we could not for the life of us find the ruined Greek temple at Himera, built after the defeat of the Carthiginians.
begins with the Carthaginian defeat at Himera in Sicily.
XVIII, 6, 6) or Amilcar, the commander defeated in Himera in 480 BC (Herod.
Ameling starts by reassessing the traditional opinion of the Battle of Himera, allegedly between a mercenary army under the Carthaginian aristocrat, Hamilcar, and joint Greek forces under the Syracusan tyrant, Gelon.
It is a shame that the methodology of the project has not been published more widely because it alone illustrates that Himera should be regarded as one of the major field surveys of the Mediterranean.
Here again, the length of discussions of the various sites fluctuates dramatically, with Himera (Sicily) treated extensively as a case-study for 5th-century houses in the broader area, with further examples substantially summarized, probably due to their inadequacy in forming `firm generalisations' (p.