Hildesheim

(redirected from Himmelsthür)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Hildesheim

(hĭl`dəs-hīm), city (1994 pop. 106,300), Lower Saxony, N central Germany. The city is an industrial and transportation center. Its manufactures include stoves, radio and television sets, and agricultural and dairy machinery. In 815, Emperor Louis I made Hildesheim the seat of a bishopric; Hildesheim's bishops later became territorial princes of the Holy Roman Empire. The city received a charter in 1249 and soon afterward joined the Hanseatic League. The bishopric was secularized at the beginning of the 19th cent.; in 1813 it passed to Hanover, and in 1866 it passed, with Hanover, to Prussia. Hildesheim owes much of its architectural beauty to one of its early bishops, St. Bernward (d. 1022). Almost all of Hildesheim's old buildings were badly damaged in World War II, but many have been restored. Among the splendid buildings, all Romanesque in style, are the cathedral (11th cent.), the Church of St. Michael (11th–12th cent.), and the Church of St. Godehard (12th cent.). The city contains a noted museum of ancient Egyptian and Greco-Roman artifacts.

Hildesheim

 

a city in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the Land of Lower Saxony. Population, 106,700 (1975). Hildesheim is a transportation junction and a landing on a branch canal of the Mittelland Canal. Industry includes nonferrous metallurgy and machine buiding.

Until their destruction in 1945, numerous works of medieval architecture and half-timbered buildings of the 15th to 18th centuries were found in Hildesheim. They included a Romanesque cathedral (ninth-llth centuries; partially rebuilt in a modern architectural idiom), the Romanesque St. Michael’s Church (llth–13th centuries; bronze doors, 1008–15), St. Godehard’s Church (1133–72), and the butchers’ guild building (1528).

REFERENCE

Hildesheim einst und heute. Hildesheim, 1966.

Hildesheim

a city in N central Germany, in Lower Saxony: a member of the Hanseatic League. Pop.: 103 245 (2003 est.)